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Background

Experience

Senator, NH Senate (2014 - 2016); Assistant District Attorney, Hampden County (1992 - 1996); General Manager, AutoServ Nissan

Family
Married; Children: 4
Education
JD, Suffolk Law, Boston, MA.
BA, University of MA, Amherst, MA.
Home Address
8 Summit Avenue
Laconia, NH 03246
Work Address
Room 101-A Legislative Office Building
33 North State Street
Concord, NH 03301

POSITION ON ISSUES

These issue positions are derived from the annual Citizens Count issue surveys or candidate websites, social media posts, media interviews, voting records, and other sources.

Crime and Public Safety

Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?
Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?
Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?
Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?
Should NH keep the death penalty?
Should NH require seat belts?
Was NH right to ban hand-held cell phone use while driving?
Should NH require motorcycle helmets?

Economy, Budget and Taxes

Should LLCs be subject to the interest and dividends tax?
Should NH increase the interest and dividends tax?
Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?
Should NH add an income tax on earned income?
Should NH raise the minimum wage?
Should NH require labels on some or all genetically modified foods?
Should NH authorize one or more casinos?
Should NH add restrictions on welfare recipients?
State role in economic growth
Do employees in NH need more legal protections in the workplace?
Should NH pass right-to-work legislation?
Should NH government switch from a pension system to a 401(k)-style retirement plan?
Should NH continue to use property taxes instead of a new broad-based tax, such as an income tax?
Should NH increase tolls and/or add new toll booths?
Should NH revise the meals and rooms tax?

Education

Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?
Should NH provide more funding for charter schools?
Should NH continue to base statewide assessments on Common Core standards?

Energy and Environment

Should NH require labels on some or all genetically modified foods?
Should NH restrict further wind power development?
Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?
Should NH allow the Northern Pass to proceed with some (not all) of the lines buried?

Health Care

Should NH require labels on some or all genetically modified foods?
Should businesses that provide insurance be required to cover contraception?
Was NH right to expand Medicaid eligibility, using private insurance wherever possible?
Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?
What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?
Should NH continue to allow medicinal marijuana?
Should parents be allowed to opt their children out of the NH immunization/vaccination registry?

Politics and Political Process

Should NH broaden campaign finance disclosure laws?
Why are you running?
What is your philosophy of government?
What differentiates you from your opponents?
Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

Recreation and Transportation

Should NH require car insurance for some or all drivers?
Should NH require seat belts?
Was NH right to ban hand-held cell phone use while driving?
Should NH use taxpayer money to build a memorial to the Old Man?
Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?
Should NH increase tolls and/or add new toll booths?
Should NH require motorcycle helmets?

Social Issues

Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?
Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?
Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?
Should NH repeal same-sex marriage?
Should NH authorize one or more casinos?
Should NH add restrictions on welfare recipients?
Should businesses that provide insurance be required to cover contraception?
Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?
Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?
What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?
Should NH continue to allow medicinal marijuana?

VOTING RECORD

This candidate did not hold office as a legislator in the most recent session, and therefore does not have a voting record available.

LEAVE A COMMENT

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COMMENTS

Andrew Hosmer
- Laconia

Wed, 08/07/2013 - 10:04pm

When I ran for the New Hampshire Senate, I wanted to bring common-sense business principles to Concord. To me, that means working with both parties to solve problems, being careful with taxpayers’ money, and focusing on things people really care about, such as economic growth and job creation, instead of getting caught in tired partisan battles.

After six months on the job, I am happy to report that we have made progress.  Real change has come to Concord.  I have been happy to see compromise, with legislators from different parties working together, and to be a part of passing meaningful legislation that moves New Hampshire forward.

For example, in this session, I worked with Republicans to modernize New Hampshire’s corporate law, making it easier to create businesses and spur job growth.  I also partnered with my Republican colleagues to double and make permanent the Research and Development Tax Credit program.  With strong bi-partisan support, I co-sponsored a bill to protect restaurants and other service-industry enterprises from higher taxes on tipped wages — taxes that they can’t afford and which could hurt employment, especially in our tourism-supported industries.  I also worked with a Republican colleague to streamline complex regulations by combining several different permits into one, thus saving time and expense for businesses, while keeping all of the same environmental protections in place. 

These steps forward which create jobs and make businesses more competitive were possible only because both parties worked together.

To help the Lakes Region, I successfully worked to insure that boating fees, intended solely for promoting water safety, will not be raided by the legislature. The tourism that is so important to the economy of our region needs support like this.  Again, I was happy to work with both sides to help everyone see the importance of promoting a thriving economy on our lakes.

Perhaps the biggest accomplishment was the two-year budget that Governor Hassan just signed into law.  By articulating clear goals, listening to both sides, and compromising, we generated a budget plan that does almost everything the Governor set out to do and gives everyone something to be proud of. 

This budget is balanced.  It creates no new taxes or fees. It keeps tax cuts for businesses.  And it spends wisely on high priorities: ending the developmental disability waitlist; increasing support for education; stabilizing funding for community mental heath organizations; restoring the program for children in need of services; and supporting innovation in the private sector.

Does it do everything that everyone wanted?  No. But by giving a little bit, both sides achieved the majority of their goals, and most important, the people and businesses of the state will be better off.  And that is what compromise is all about.

Clearly, more work lies ahead.   We need to find a way to invest more in roads and bridges to keep our state competitive in the global marketplace and lower costs for drivers.  We need to leverage Medicaid expansion so 58,000 hardworking, tax-paying Granite Staters are covered, creating 5,100 jobs, and expanding our economy by $2 billion.  In all of this we must continue to look for ways to streamline government functions and continue to create an economic environment where New Hampshire businesses can thrive.

I am encouraged by the cooperation and progress that I have seen so far, and I have been glad to help get Concord back to working together on solving problems and moving our state forward again.

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