Issue Transparency

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Took Survey
17
of 18
2018 Declared Issue Positions

Background

Experience

Representative, NH House of Representatives (2012 - 2014, 2016 - present); Selectman, Town of Barrington; Former Chief Development Officer, New Hampshire Public Television

Family
Married; Children: 0
Education
BA, Coe College, Cedar Rapids, IA.
MS, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.
Home Address
10 Van Etten Drive
Greenland, NH 03840

Legislator Activity Profile

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this elected official's activities at the Statehouse. They are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber in 2019.

Attendance
How often does the elected official attend official legislative days?
Average 92%
100% Present
Partisanship
How often does the elected official vote with the majority of fellow party members (applies to Democrats and Republicans only)?
Average 95%
99% With Party
Voting Participation
How often does the elected official cast a vote during official roll call votes?
Average 89%
100% Roll Call Votes
Bill Prime Sponsorship
Does the elected official prime sponsor bills?
Average 2
0 Prime Sponsored Bills
How many of the elected official’s prime sponsored bills became law?
Average 1
0 Became Law

POSITION ON ISSUES

These issue positions are derived from the annual Citizens Count issue surveys or candidate websites, social media posts, media interviews, voting records, and other sources.

Crime and Public Safety

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?
Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?
Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?
Was NH right to ban hand-held cell phone use while driving?
Is police brutality an issue in NH?
Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?

Economy, Budget and Taxes

Should NH raise the minimum wage?
Should NH authorize one or more casinos?
Should NH require labels on some or all genetically modified foods?
Should New Hampshire government do more to increase the supply of affordable housing?
Should NH add an income tax on earned income?
Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?
Should New Hampshire increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment?

Education

Should NH continue to base statewide assessments on Common Core standards?
Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?
Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?

Energy and Environment

Should NH restrict further wind power development?
Should NH allow the Northern Pass to proceed with some (not all) of the lines buried?
Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?
Should New Hampshire maintain the renewable portfolio standard, which requires public utilities in New Hampshire to obtain a certain percentage of electricity from renewable energy sources (25% by 2025)?
Should NH require labels on some or all genetically modified foods?

Health Care

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?
What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?
Should parents be allowed to opt their children out of the NH immunization/vaccination registry?
Was NH right to expand Medicaid eligibility, using private insurance wherever possible?
Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?
Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?
Should NH allow physician assisted suicide?
Should NH require labels on some or all genetically modified foods?

Politics and Political Process

Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?
Should NH broaden campaign finance disclosure laws?
Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

Recreation and Transportation

Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?
Was NH right to ban hand-held cell phone use while driving?

Social Issues

Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?
Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?
Should NH authorize one or more casinos?
Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?
What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?
Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?
Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?
Should NH allow physician assisted suicide?
Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?

VOTING RECORD

2019

Crime and Public Safety

HB 109 (2019) - Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks. Also requires private sales or transfers to go through a licensed firearm dealer, if it’s not absolutely clear that both the owner and the recipient are allowed to own guns. - Voted to expand firearm background checks
HB 455 (2019) - Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole. - Voted to repeal death penalty
HB 481 (2019) - Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. A Cannabis Control Commission, similar to the Liquor Commission, would be responsible for licensing and enforcement. The bill also allows limited home-growing of marijuana for personal use. - Voted against legalizing marijuana
HB 514 (2019) - Establishes a seven day waiting period for the delivery of a firearm. There are some exceptions for rifle or shotgun purchases by hunters, law enforcement officers, and members of the armed forces. The Senate amended the bill, shortening the waiting period to three days. - Voted for a three-day waiting period and a seven-day waiting period
HB 564 (2019) - Makes it a misdemeanor to carry a firearm in a safe school zone. ˙There are some exceptions, for example if a person gets permission from the school board. The House amended the bill so that parents do not need to remove or unload firearms in their cars when picking up students. The amendment also specifically bans firearms on "school property" rather than in "school zones." School property includes buildings, grounds, school buses, and vans. A conference committee of representatives and senators amended the bill so that the school board may only give permission for a person to carry a firearm after holding a public hearing. - Voted to ban firearms on school property
HB 481 (2019) - Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. A Cannabis Control Commission, similar to the Liquor Commission, would be responsible for licensing and enforcement. The bill also allows limited home-growing of marijuana for personal use. - Voted against legalizing marijuana
HB 564 (2019) - Makes it a misdemeanor to carry a firearm in a safe school zone. ˙There are some exceptions, for example if a person gets permission from the school board. The House amended the bill so that parents do not need to remove or unload firearms in their cars when picking up students. The amendment also specifically bans firearms on "school property" rather than in "school zones." School property includes buildings, grounds, school buses, and vans. A conference committee of representatives and senators amended the bill so that the school board may only give permission for a person to carry a firearm after holding a public hearing. - Voted to ban firearms on school property

Economy, Budget and Taxes

SB 1 (2019) - Establishes a paid family and medical leave insurance program, which would be run by the state department of employment security. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. The bill does not allow anyone to opt-out of the program. - Voted for mandatory paid family and medical leave program
SB 10 (2019) - Increases the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020, then to $11 in 2022, except starting that year, employers would have to pay at least $12 per hour if they do not offer at least 10 paid sick days to employees.  The House and Senate amended the bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020 and $12 per hour in 2022, regardless of sick time. - Voted to raise the minimum wage
HB 1 (2019) - 2020-2021 state budget bill. - Voted for state budget bill
HB 2 (2019) - 2020-2021 state budget bill (part 2). - Voted for state budget bill (part 2)
SB 1 (2019) - Establishes a paid family and medical leave insurance program, which would be run by the state department of employment security. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. The bill does not allow anyone to opt-out of the program. - Voted for mandatory paid family and medical leave program
SB 1 (2019) - Establishes a paid family and medical leave insurance program, which would be run by the state department of employment security. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. The bill does not allow anyone to opt-out of the program. - Voted for mandatory paid family and medical leave program

Energy and Environment

HB 558 (2019) - Prohibits food service businesses from providing a single-use plastic straw to a customer unless specifically requested. - Voted to restrict plastic straws
HB 365 (2019) - Increases the electric generating capacity of customer generators who may participate in net energy metering, generally from 1 megawatt to 5 megawatts. - Voted to increase max size of net metering projects

Health Care

SB 290 (2019) - Modifies the work and community engagement requirements for the Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. For example, this bill extends the work requirement exemption for parents so that parents of children under age 13 are eligible for the exemption. This bill also gives the Department of Health and Human Services the authority to waive the work requirement until July 2021 if there is an inability to communicate with program participants. - Voted to ease work requirements for expanded Medicaid

Politics and Political Process

HB 105 (2019) - Generally repeals the voter registration changes passed in SB 3. For example, this bill removes the stricter requirements for voters who register within 30 days of an election. This bill also removes much of the new language on voter registration forms about domicile. This bill also removes the authority of the secretary of state to conduct post-election voter registration investigations, leaving that to the attorney general. - Voted to repeal stricter voter registration requirements
HB 706 (2019) - Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by the secretary of state after a public application process that includes input from legislative leaders. The Senate amended the bill, generally giving the Secretary of State less say in the process. - Voted for independent redistricting commission

Social Issues

HB 446 (2019) - Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate. The Senate amended the bill, for example to require the permission of a parent or guardian if a minor seeks a birth certificate change. - Voted to make it easier to change gender identity on birth certificates

LEAVE A COMMENT

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COMMENTS

Douglas Wilson
- Greenland

Sat, 11/09/2019 - 8:44pm

Good morning David,

Currently, the Salvation Army has the resources to open new addiction-recovery centers in NH at no cost to the State, but owing to current underutilization of their existing recovery centers in Maine and Massachusetts, they have opted to conserve their resources and remain outside the state.

Can something be done to change this situation? What if a bill were proposed in the NH legislature that, if passed, would require the State's detox centers and courts to send their patients and inmates to free out-of-state recovery centers, so long as beds are available? The justification for the law would be that it would save the NH taxpayers money, and would create the demand for additional privately-funded centers to open in cities like Manchester, Nashua and Laconia.

If you agree that passing a law could bring free, privately-funded recovery services to NH residents, I can work with my local state representative to promote the needed legislation. I have provided contact information below for the Salvation Army's Portland adult recovery center.

Best regards,

Doug Wilson

Greenland, NH

603 502 9234

Major Ronald Bernardi

207 878 8555 ext 301

Ronald.Bernardi@use.salvationarmy.org

Good morning David,

Currently, the Salvation Army has the resources to open new addiction-recovery centers in NH at no cost to the State, but owing to current underutilization of their existing recovery centers in Maine and Massachusetts, they have opted to conserve their resources and remain outside the state.

Can something be done to change this situation? What if a bill were proposed in the NH legislature that, if passed, would require the State's detox centers and courts to send their patients and inmates to free out-of-state recovery centers, so long as beds are available? The justification for the law would be that it would save the NH taxpayers money, and would create the demand for additional privately-funded centers to open in cities like Manchester, Nashua and Laconia.

If you agree that passing a law could bring free, privately-funded recovery services to NH residents, I can work with my local state representative to promote the needed legislation. I have provided contact information below for the Salvation Army's Portland adult recovery center.

Best regards,

Doug Wilson

Greenland, NH

603 502 9234

Major Ronald Bernardi

207 878 8555 ext 301

Ronald.Bernardi@use.salvationarmy.org

Good morning David,

Currently, the Salvation Army has the resources to open new addiction-recovery centers in NH at no cost to the State, but owing to current underutilization of their existing recovery centers in Maine and Massachusetts, they have opted to conserve their resources and remain outside the state.

Can something be done to change this situation? What if a bill were proposed in the NH legislature that, if passed, would require the State's detox centers and courts to send their patients and inmates to free out-of-state recovery centers, so long as beds are available? The justification for the law would be that it would save the NH taxpayers money, and would create the demand for additional privately-funded centers to open in cities like Manchester, Nashua and Laconia.

If you agree that passing a law could bring free, privately-funded recovery services to NH residents, I can work with my local state representative to promote the needed legislation. I have provided contact information below for the Salvation Army's Portland adult recovery center.

Best regards,

Doug Wilson

Greenland, NH

603 502 9234

Major Ronald Bernardi

207 878 8555 ext 301

Ronald.Bernardi@use.salvationarmy.org

Dear Representative Malloy:

Currently, the Salvation Army has the resources to open new addiction-recovery centers in NH at no cost to the State, but owing to current underutilization of their existing recovery centers in Maine and Massachusetts, they have opted to conserve resources and remain outside the state.

Can something be done to change this situation? What if a bill were proposed in the NH legislature that, if passed, would require the State's detox centers and courts to send their patients and inmates to free out-of-state recovery centers, so long as beds at these facilities are available? The justification for the law would be that it would save the NH taxpayers money, and would create the demand for additional privately-funded centers to open in cities like Manchester, Nashua and Laconia.

I have provided contact information below for the Salvation Army's Portland adult recovery center.

Best regards,

Doug Wilson
Greenland, NH
603 502 9234

Major Ronald Bernardi
207 878 8555 ext 301
Ronald.Bernardi@use.salvationarmy.org

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