Democrat

Background

Experience

Senator, NH Senate (2006 - 2010); Representative, NH House of Representatives (2004 - 2006, 2014 - present); Candidate, NH Governor (2012); Former Owner, Cilley and Associates; Teacher

Family
Married; Children: 5
Education
BA/MBA, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH.
Home Address
8 Oak Hill Rd
Barrington, NH 03825

POSITION ON ISSUES

These issue positions are derived from the annual Citizens Count issue surveys or candidate websites, social media posts, media interviews, voting records, and other sources.

Crime and Public Safety

Should NH keep the death penalty?
Should NH require seat belts?
Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?
Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?
Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?
Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?

Economy, Budget and Taxes

Should NH do more to limit eminent domain?
Should NH pass a constitutional amendment giving the Legislature more control over the distribution of school funding?
Should NH continue to use property taxes instead of a new broad-based tax, such as an income tax?
Should NH add an income tax on earned income?
Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?
Should NH authorize one or more casinos?
Should NH pass right-to-work legislation?
Should NH raise the minimum wage?
Should NH add restrictions on welfare recipients?

Education

Should NH pass a constitutional amendment giving the Legislature more control over the distribution of school funding?
Should NH continue to base statewide assessments on Common Core standards?
Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?
Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?

Energy and Environment

Should NH do more to limit eminent domain?
Should NH allow the Northern Pass to proceed with some (not all) of the lines buried?
Should NH restrict further wind power development?

Health Care

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?
Should parents be allowed to opt their children out of the NH immunization/vaccination registry?
What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?
Was NH right to expand Medicaid eligibility, using private insurance wherever possible?
Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?
Should NH limit access to abortion?
Should NH expand its medical marijuana law?
Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?

Politics and Political Process

Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?
Should NH limit terms for elected officials?
Should NH broaden campaign finance disclosure laws?

Recreation and Transportation

Should NH require seat belts?
Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?

Social Issues

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?
Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?
Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?
Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?
What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?
Should NH authorize one or more casinos?
Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?
Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?
Should NH limit access to abortion?
Should NH add restrictions on welfare recipients?

VOTING RECORD

2018

Crime and Public Safety

SB 500 (2018) - Removes the prohibition of carrying a loaded rifle or shotgun in or on a stationary motor vehicle, OHRV, snowmobile, or aircraft. This bill also changes some legal references to firearms, and allows licensed bow hunters to carry firearms. Lastly, this bill removes the ability to deny or revoke a hunting license if a person "is not a suitable person to carry firearms." The Senate amended the bill to also allow carrying a loaded firearm on a moving vehicle if the person is protecting livestock or crops. The Senate amendment also allows hunting with an air rifle. - Voted against changing firearm and hunting laws
SB 593 (2018) - Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole. - Voted to repeal the death penalty
CACR 22 (2018) - Constitutional amendment establishing various rights for crime victims. - Voted against constitutional amendment
SB 500 (2018) - Removes the prohibition of carrying a loaded rifle or shotgun in or on a stationary motor vehicle, OHRV, snowmobile, or aircraft. This bill also changes some legal references to firearms, and allows licensed bow hunters to carry firearms. Lastly, this bill removes the ability to deny or revoke a hunting license if a person "is not a suitable person to carry firearms." The Senate amended the bill to also allow carrying a loaded firearm on a moving vehicle if the person is protecting livestock or crops. The Senate amendment also allows hunting with an air rifle. - Voted against changing firearm and hunting laws

Health Care

HB 1680 (2018) - Prohibits abortion after viability, unless the mother's life is in danger, "in cases of Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome, or to remove a fetus with severe anomalies incompatible with life." - Voted to table this bill, effectively killing the bill for 2018
SB 313 (2018) - Continues New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program. This bill makes several significant changes to the program. First, it moves participants off private insurance and into managed care, similar to traditional Medicaid enrollees. Second, it adds a work requirement for participants. Third, it removes funding from voluntary contributions by health care providers, which the federal government said is illegal. Instead, bill sponsors say the program will use revenue from alcohol sales to fund the program.  SB 313 also establishes the Granite Workforce program, which will use some federal welfare funding to establish a program that will help place low income individuals in jobs in areas with workforce shortages.   - Voted for Medicaid expansion
HB 1680 (2018) - Prohibits abortion after viability, unless the mother's life is in danger, "in cases of Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome, or to remove a fetus with severe anomalies incompatible with life." - Voted to table this bill, effectively killing the bill for 2018

Politics and Political Process

HB 1264 (2018) - Redefines "resident" and "inhabitant" to remove the phrase "for the indefinite future." This bill would potentially require all voters domiciled in New Hampshire to follow residency laws, such as the requirement to register any car in New Hampshire. - Voted against voter residency requirement

Social Issues

HB 1319 (2018) - Prohibits discrimination based on gender identity. - Voted to add gender identity to anti-discrimination laws
2017

Crime and Public Safety

HB 640 (2017) - Decriminalizes possession of 3/4 ounce or less of marijuana, with additional penalties for violators under age twenty-one. - Voted to decriminalize marijuana
SB 12 (2017) - Increases the length of time for which a license to carry a concealed firearm is valid, and repeals the requirement to obtain a license to carry a concealed firearm. - Voted to keep the license to carry a concealed firearm
HB 656 (2017) - Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. The bill outlines various regulations, from the ability of municipalities to control the location of marijuana establishments, to labels disclosing the THC in each serving of a marijuana product. The bill also legalizes hemp. The House amended the bill to instead legalize possession and homegrowing of marijuana without allowing sales. - Voted to legalize marijuana without allowing sales
SB 131 (2017) - Appropriates $1,155,000 to hire five state troopers assigned to drug enforcement on the state border. This bill also appropriates $3,340,000 for state and local law enforcement and the state lab for overtime related to drug enforcement. - Voted for additional drug enforcement funding
SB 66 (2017) - Includes fetuses as potential victims under murder statutes. The Senate amended the bill to include only fetuses twenty weeks and older, not just "viable" fetuses. - Voted against fetal homicide law
HB 656 (2017) - Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. The bill outlines various regulations, from the ability of municipalities to control the location of marijuana establishments, to labels disclosing the THC in each serving of a marijuana product. The bill also legalizes hemp. The House amended the bill to instead legalize possession and homegrowing of marijuana without allowing sales. - Voted to legalize marijuana without allowing sales
SB 66 (2017) - Includes fetuses as potential victims under murder statutes. The Senate amended the bill to include only fetuses twenty weeks and older, not just "viable" fetuses. - Voted against fetal homicide law

Economy, Budget and Taxes

HB 144 (2017) - Changes the annual county budget procedures for Rockingham County to match those used in Hillsborough County. Since the House failed to pass the 2018-2019 budget bill HB 1, the Senate amended this bill into a new budget bill. - Voted against 2018-2019 budget bill
SB 10 (2017) - Creates a program to repay licensed milk producers from losses during the 2016 drought. The bill appropriates $2 million to the Milk Producers Emergency Relief Fund. - Voted for dairy farmer assistance
SB 11 (2017) - Right-to-Work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union. - Voted against Right to Work
SB 242 (2017) - Authorizes one smaller and one larger casino with video lottery and table gaming. The smaller casino would pay an initial ten-year license fee of $40 million, and the larger casino would pay an initial ten-year license fee of $80 million. The casinos would pay a tax of 35% on gross slot machine revenue and 18% on gross table game revenue. The Legislature would choose how to distribute this revenue, provided that some of the revenue goes to towns hosting or neighboring the casino, and some of the revenue goes to treat problem gambling. - Voted to consider casinos
HB 628 (2017) - Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. The House amended the bill to increase the employee contribution to 0.67%, to allow employees to opt out, and to limit benefits to six weeks of paid leave. - Voted for family and medical leave insurance program
HB 115 (2017) - Raises the minimum wage to $9.50 in 2018 and $12 in 2019, with annual cost of living adjustments starting in 2020. The bill also establishes a training wage that is one dollar less than the minimum wage for the first three months of employment for someone sixteen or seventeen years-old. - Voted to consider a minimum wage increase
HB 144 (2017) - Changes the annual county budget procedures for Rockingham County to match those used in Hillsborough County. Since the House failed to pass the 2018-2019 budget bill HB 1, the Senate amended this bill into a new budget bill. - Voted against 2018-2019 budget bill
SB 242 (2017) - Authorizes one smaller and one larger casino with video lottery and table gaming. The smaller casino would pay an initial ten-year license fee of $40 million, and the larger casino would pay an initial ten-year license fee of $80 million. The casinos would pay a tax of 35% on gross slot machine revenue and 18% on gross table game revenue. The Legislature would choose how to distribute this revenue, provided that some of the revenue goes to towns hosting or neighboring the casino, and some of the revenue goes to treat problem gambling. - Voted to consider casinos

Education

SB 191 (2017) - Increases state funding for full-day kindergarten programs, with adjustments based on the number of English language learners and free and reduced lunch students in each district. The House amended the bill to simply provide full funding for full-day kindergarten programs, and half funding for half-day kindergarten programs. The House also added keno legalization to the bill to create the revenue for kindergarten funding. - Voted against full day kindergarten funding with keno
HB 103 (2017) - Requires school districts to provide advance notice to parents and legal guardians of course material involving discussion of human sexuality or human sexual education. - Voted against parental notification
SB 193 (2017) - Establishes the "education freedom savings account program." This allows a parent to contract with a scholarship organization so that state education funding is transferred to the student's scholarship account rather than to the municipality in which the student resides.  The House amended the bill to limit the scholarships to certain students, particularly low income students, students in underperforming schools, and special education students.  The amended version also requires any student receiving a scholarship to complete an annual assessment to ensure academic progress. Lastly, if enough students leave a school district, the state will reimburse the school for some of the lost state education funding. - Voted to send this bill to interim study, effectively killing the bill for 2018
SB 8 (2017) - Allows a school district to assign a child to a non-sectarian private school if there is no public school for the child's grade in the child's resident district. The bill was amended to also require the non-sectarian private school to administer an annual assessment. - Voted against allowing assignment to a private school
HB 103 (2017) - Requires school districts to provide advance notice to parents and legal guardians of course material involving discussion of human sexuality or human sexual education. - Voted against parental notification

Energy and Environment

HB 592 (2017) - Repeals the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). The House amended the bill to instead end energy efficiency grants, and send all the proceeds from RGGI to commercial and residential ratepayer rebates. - Voted against revising RGGI

Health Care

HB 587 (2017) - Prohibits conversion therapy for anyone under age eighteen. Conversion therapy attempts to change a person's sexual orientation. - Voted to ban conversion therapy
HB 157 (2017) - Adds chronic pain to the qualifying medical conditions for medical marijuana. - Voted to allow marijuana for chronic pain
HB 587 (2017) - Prohibits conversion therapy for anyone under age eighteen. Conversion therapy attempts to change a person's sexual orientation. - Voted to ban conversion therapy

Politics and Political Process

SB 3 (2017) - Changes the definition of domicile for voting purposes to make it more restrictive. This bill explicitly excludes anyone who comes to the state "for temporary purposes," such as volunteering or working on political campaigns. Out-of-state college students are still allowed to claim a domicile in New Hampshire. However, if someone moves to a new New Hampshire address within 30 days of voting, he or she must present proof of intent to stay in New Hampshire. This proof could include a lease, driver's license, a child's enrollment at a public school, etc. The voter has until 10 days after the election to provide this proof to the town clerk. If the voter does not present this proof, he or she may be investigated, including a home visit by election officials. - Voted against stricter voter registration laws

Social Issues

HB 478 (2017) - Prohibits discrimination based on gender identity. - Voted to consider gender identity discrimination protections

Campaign Finances

Campaign finances are not available for this candidate.

VIDEOS

COMMENTS

Mark Fernald
- Peterborough

Mon, 08/27/2012 - 11:51am

Dear Readers:

In this year’s governor’s race, I am endorsing Jackie.  I am writing to ask that you consider supporting her too.

It has been a difficult year and a half for New Hampshire.  The legislature sent a wrecking ball through institutions and values that we hold dear when it cut general fund spending by 12%. Higher education, hospitals, care for children in crisis, mental health care––the list goes on and on and on. Name anything a vibrant economy and healthy society stands on, and it was cut.

You might think the blame lies only with the Tea Party, but you would be wrong.  Republicans?  Wrong again.  The culprit in this tale of woe is Pledge politics.

Too many politicians are unwilling to talk about revenue.  Voters at the local level act like grownups.  Sometimes they vote to increase their taxes to pay for a new fire engine, a teacher contract, or a needed road project.  Politicians in Concord take pledges.  They claim our tax structure is a given, and that we can only spend what our current mix of taxes brings in.

The trend at the state level is not just discouraging, it’s positively frightening.  We have a tax structure that does not grow with the economy, so government programs cannot keep pace with inflation and population growth.  In the ten years from 2001 to 2011, the total income of the people of New Hampshire grew by 38%, while the state’s general fund budget grew only 20%--lower than the rate of inflation.

Over the past thirty years, through administrations both Republican and Democratic, Pledge politics has been ratcheting down the state budget, to the detriment of the people of New Hampshire and its property taxpayers.  Our state parks have deteriorated.  Our community mental health centers, which were a model for the rest of the nation, have been gutted.  State aid to higher education is the lowest in the nation, and our college students graduate with the highest student loan debt in the nation.  State aid to local government has been cut, and cut again, shifting the tax burden onto the property tax.  In 1999, property taxes made up 59% of all state and local taxes in New Hampshire.  In 2011, it was 66%.  In those twelve years, the total property tax bill in New Hampshire doubled.

There are two fine women Democrats, both veteran legislators, who are running for Governor this year:  Maggie Hassan of Exeter and Jackie Cilley of Barrington.  Maggie Hassan has taken the Pledge against any broad-based sales or income tax.  Jackie Cilley has not.  And that makes all the difference.  Visit www . pledgezombies . com to see Jackie's first ad on this subject.

Jackie Cilley is willing to have an open, honest conversation with the people about all options to fund our priorities. Maggie Hassan is not willing to do that. In fact, Maggie recently told a voter she would not even support a review of our current revenue system.

Maggie Hassan has been honest in saying that this is a tactical decision, that New Hampshire is not ready to have a conversation about taxes.  But if she is elected, she will be a Democrat in a Republican box.  On vital issues of taxes and spending, she will have conceded to the Republicans before the legislature is even seated.

We have the third-highest property taxes in the nation.  Our state and local tax burden on retired homeowners is the highest in the nation.  Our state and local tax burden on the top 1% is the fifth-lowest in the nation.  If someone comes up with a plan to cut homeowners’ property taxes, restore funding to education and human services, bring in millions of dollars from out-of-staters, and make our tax system more equitable, should we consider such a plan?  Jackie Cilley says YES and Maggie Hassan says NO.

This election is not just about property taxes and the state budget.  Jackie will work to defend a woman’s right to choose, marriage equality, and public education.  She will uphold regulations that protect our environment and consumers.

If you would like to help Jackie Cilley’s campaign, please do one or more of the following:

  • Make a donation, of any amount, at www.jackiecilley.com
  • Volunteer to make phone calls, or for a road sign or a bumper sticker by visiting www.jackiecilley.com
  • Forward this email to everyone you know in New Hampshire and urge them to vote for Jackie Cilley on September 11.

Mark Fernald

Sharon

mark@markfernald.com

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