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These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse in 2023. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. Gov. Sununu is still in the process of signing and vetoing 2023 bills, so the number of prime sponsored bills that became law may increase.

Session days attended
100% Present
Average 95%
Party unity score/partisanship
96% With Party
Average 95%
Participated in official roll call votes
99% Roll Call Votes
Average 93%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
4 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 2
Prime sponsored bills that became law
0 Became Law

Voting Record

CACR 23 (2024)

Constitutional amendment creating a right to abortion, including a ban on any restrictions on abortion prior to 24 weeks.

HB 10 (2023)

Establishes a parental bill of rights. Some of the parental rights in this bill include:
"The right to direct the education and care of his or her minor child"
"The right to be physically present at any health care facility ... at which their minor child is receiving hospital care"
"The right to consent in writing before a biometric scan of his or her minor child is made, shared, or stored"

HB 106 (2023)

Establishes a procedure for issuing "extreme risk protection orders" to protect against persons who pose an immediate risk of harm to themselves or others. An extreme risk protection order would restrict a person's access to firearms, and is also known as a "red flag law."

HB 1145 (2024)

Prohibits new solid waste landfill permits in the state for facilities owned by any person other than the state of New Hampshire or a political subdivision thereof.

HB 1205 (2024)

Prohibits anyone with the reproductive biology and genetics of a male at birth from participating on school sports teams designated for females. As introduced, this bill covered K-12 schools as well as the university and community college system. The House amended the bill so that it only applies to middle and high schools.

HB 1248 (2024)

Changes the state limit on abortion after 24 weeks gestation to 15 days gestation.

HB 1283 (2024)

Establishes a procedure for an individual with terminal illness to receive medical assistance in dying through the self administration of medication (sometimes called physician-assisted suicide). The bill establishes criteria for the prescription of such medication and establishes reporting requirements and penalties for misuse or noncompliance.

HB 1291 (2024)

Increases the number of accessory dwelling units (ADUs) allowed by right from one to two. This bill also increases the maximum square footage from 750 square feet to 1,000 square feet (and 850 square feet for a second unit). The bill then sets other regulations municipalities can and cannot require for ADUs. For example, the bill states that municipalities may require a property to have at least one half acre to have more than one ADU.

HB 1322 (2024)

Gradually increases the minimum wage to $17 per hour by 2029. This bill then allows future increases best on the Northeast Consumer Price Index. This bill also increases the tipped minimum wage from 45% to 50% of the regular minimum wage.

HB 1377 (2024)

Right-to-work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union.

HB 1419 (2024)

Prohibits K-12 schools from making "any material that is harmful to minors" available to students. The bill defines this material to include various content related to sex. This bill also requires school boards to adopt complaint resolution policies to address complaints regarding harmful material by parents or guardians.

HB 1649 (2024)

Restricts the use of per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in consumer products. For example, this bill bans the sale of cosmetics, food packing, carpets, and more products with added PFAS starting July 1, 2028. The House changed that date to January 1, 2027.

The Senate amended the bill to also state that settlement funds from PFAS lawsuits will be deposited in the drinking water and groundwater trust fund and used to fund public water systems impacted by PFAS.

HB 1656 (2024)

Greatly increases the per-pupil state education funding for each student receiving special education services. The House amended the bill to establish three weighted categories for special education differentiated aid, with more funding going to students who need more services.

HB 1711 (2024)

Establishes a system to report to the firearm background check system if a person is found not guilty by reason of insanity, not competent to stand trial, or involuntarily committed to a mental health facility. This bill also allows the court to order a person to surrender their firearms in these circumstances. This bill also establishes a process for a person to have their record removed from the background check system after six months, if they are no longer a danger to themselves or others.

HB 2 (2023)

State budget bill (part 2). The governor presented his proposal for the next state budget February 14. The House and Senate both made changes to that proposal. Click here to read a summary of the 2023 budget process.

HB 208 (2023)

Establishes greenhouse gas emission reduction goals for the state, to net zero by 2050. This bill also requires the Department of Environmental Services to develop a climate action plan by July 1, 2024, that includes evaluation of best available information, considers inclusion of strategies, programs and compliance mechanisms with measurable goals and targets, considers opportunities to encourage investment in low/moderate income, rural and minority communities, makes recommendations on retraining and apprenticeship opportunities, and coordinates with other state agencies.

HB 224 (2023)

Repeals the civil and criminal penalties for health care providers who violate the state's ban on abortion after 24 weeks.

HB 367 (2023)

Increases the maximum household income limit for participation in the Education Freedom Account program, from 300% to 500% of the federal poverty guidelines. The Education Freedom Account program allows families to spend the state's per-pupil share of education funding on private or home school expenses.

The House amended the bill to only increase the income limit to 350% of the federal poverty guidelines.

HB 470 (2023)

Exempts some drug checking equipment from the definition of drug paraphernalia, and allows the use of drug checking equipment, such as fentanyl test strips, for harm reduction.

HB 523 (2023)

Increases the maximum electric generating capacity to participate in net energy metering, from one to five megawatts. This bill also modifies the transition of tariffs applicable to some customer-generators.

HB 557 (2023)

Removes the authority of the Department of Health and Human Services to require vaccinations beyond those in state law. This bill specifically notes that the requirements for chickenpox, Hepatitis B, and Hib vaccinations will expire in 2026.

HB 567 (2023)

Requires at least 30 days written notice for a rent increase. Large, multi-unit rental owners must provide at least 60 days notice. If the rent increase is over 15%, large multi-unit landlords must provide at least 6 months notice.

HB 57 (2023)

Gradually raises the minimum wage to $15 per hour over the next three years, with future adjustments based on the consumer price index. This bill also raises the tipped minimum wage from 45% to 50% of the regular minimum wage. Lastly, this bill allows a minimum wage of $8 per hour for youth under age 18 for the first six months of employment.

HB 59 (2023)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks.

HB 619 (2023)

Prohibits gender transition care for minors under age 18. This bill also prohibits teaching about gender identity in public schools (with an exception for high school psychology courses), requires schools to use the name and gender that students are enrolled as, prohibits students from participating on sports teams that do not correspond to their biological sex at birth, and requires students to use the bathroom that corresponds with their biological sex at birth.

HB 624 (2023)

Requires state and local law enforcement to notify the public before an immigration checkpoint.

HB 639 (2023)

Legalizes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. The bill allows limited home-growing of marijuana. A new Cannabis Commission would oversee licensing and regulations related to the manufacture, testing, and sale of legal marijuana. Cannabis sales would be taxed under the Meals and Rooms tax system. Alternative Treatment Centers, which currently serve the state's medical marijuana patients, would be allowed to apply for a "dual use certificate" that allows them to participate in recreational marijuana business. Towns could limit marijuana businesses.

SB 263 (2023)

Permanently reauthorizes the New Hampshire Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. Previous law ended the program on December 31, 2023. This bill also reestablishes and revises the commission to evaluate the New Hampshire Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid.

SB 272 (2023)

Establishes a parental bill of rights in education. Some of the parental rights in this bill include:
"The right to access and review all medical records of a child maintained by a school or school personnel"
"The right to inquire of the school or school personnel and to be truthfully and completely informed if the child is being identified or referred to by school district staff, as being of a gender other than that of which the child was identified or referred when enrolled"

Position on Issues

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the “Education Freedom Account” program, which gives students access to the per-pupil share of state school funding to spend on private school or home school expenses?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban abortions during the first trimester (e.g. after 6 weeks gestation)?

"Both sides of this issue have valid concerns. Personally, I would not want to abort a child of mine but I understand there are circumstances where doing so is necessary to save the life of the mother or the child might be afflicted by a serious birth defect. These are deep topics that require much reflection. What I would like to see is more private entities (churches, community groups, etc.) step up to support mothers who are considering an abortion. Using armed men to prevent abortions will only drive desperate mothers underground and into dangerous situations. We need to address this issue from multiple angles. And this requires all of us to step forward if we want to see a change in the status quo."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban abortions during the second trimester (e.g. after 15 weeks gestation)?

"Both sides of this issue have valid concerns. Personally, I would not want to abort a child of mine but I understand there are circumstances where doing so is necessary to save the life of the mother or the child might be afflicted by a serious birth defect. These are deep topics that require much reflection. What I would like to see is more private entities (churches, community groups, etc.) step up to support mothers who are considering an abortion. Using armed men to prevent abortions will only drive desperate mothers underground and into dangerous situations. We need to address this issue from multiple angles. And this requires all of us to step forward if we want to see a change in the status quo."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban discussions about sexual orientation and gender identity in grades K-3?

"Let kids be kids. If parents want to delve into these topics so be it. But we should not be spending taxpayer money and valuable classroom time on such topics."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the state law that bans teaching certain concepts, such as the idea that people may be "inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously"?

"Until proficiency rates on core topics such as reading, writing, and arithmetic are respectable I see no reason to waste valuable classroom time on making kids feel guilty for the color of their skin or conversely doomed to a life of being a second-class citizen. Equality of opportunity, not equality of outcome should be our goal."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire add a tax credit for businesses that contribute to student loan repayment for employees?

"I'd like to see the details of such a plan before saying yes. It sounds good at first glance though."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire lower business taxes?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire government do more to address climate change?

"Individuals need to make personal decisions to alleviate their strain on the environment. This includes voting with their dollars by purchasing products from responsible companies. Using government to do so will only result in corruption and delay."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support giving voters who register without ID on Election Day a ballot that only counts if they return identifying documents to the state before a deadline?

"I'd like to see the details of this propsal before supporting it."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire add a fee or mileage charge for electric vehicle owners to help pay for transportation and/or electric infrastructure?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should NH add an income tax on earned income?

"NEVER!!"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the option of mail-in ballots for all voters, not just absentees?

"We need to guarantee honest elections or our whole form of government will collapse. The day people believe their vote doesn't matter is the day people will enact Article 10 of the NH Constitution: The Right of Revolution."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by allowing home-growing and private use without sales?

"It should be completely legalized without restrictions on private sales. We've wasted enough tax-payer money on this failed war on drugs. It's time we learned the lessons of alcohol prohibition. All we are doing is enriching violent street gangs."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by licensing growers and private retail locations?

"It should be completely legalized without restrictions on private sales. We've wasted enough tax-payer money on this failed war on drugs. It's time we learned the lessons of alcohol prohibition. All we are doing is enriching violent street gangs."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by establishing state-run cannabis stores?

"It should be completely legalized without restrictions on private sales. We've wasted enough tax-payer money on this failed war on drugs. It's time we learned the lessons of alcohol prohibition. All we are doing is enriching violent street gangs."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire raise the minimum wage?

"I don't think the government should be dictating wages. If someone can provide me with data showing that raising the minimum wage benefits the working class then I would change my mind. A minimum wage appears to hurt those just entering the workforce such as high school kids because they don't possess the skills yet to make their employment worthwhile to businesses in general. From a Forbes article: 'Another way we can get black teenagers working is by reducing the minimum wage so that employers will hire more people. Increasing the minimum wage does not move working families out of poverty. On the contrary, it discourages employers who are trying to meet a payroll from keeping low-wage workers employed, and certainly from hiring new ones. A higher minimum wage impacts those with the fewest skills or least experience the most, which often means teenagers looking for entry-level jobs. By lowering the minimum wage, or at least by establishing a teenage or sub-minimum wage, more young people will be hired and have the opportunity to learn how to be in the workforce in America. 'I understand that people on the left will howl at the thought of decreasing the minimum wage. But teenagers who are on a ledge, are heading in the wrong direction, or are involved in unproductive or potentially criminal activity just need to be employed. If it takes reducing the minimum wage to get people hired, then we must do it. Practically, the risk to us of social unrest is too horrific to even consider.' https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidmarotta/2021/03/24/raising-the-minimum-wages-hurts-the-most-disadvantaged/?sh=878e22342dc1"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should the state permanently increase how much tax revenue it shares with towns and cities every year, beyond public school funding?

"People who pay taxes should have a direct say in how it is spent. The easiest way for that to occur is at the level of government closest to them which is their individual towns."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the gradual phase-out of the Interests and Dividends tax?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the state’s current system of public school funding, with each district’s total funding primarily dependent on local property tax revenue?

"I'd like to explore other options. My main concern is that with artificially inflated property values many households are struggling to make ends meet. The privately-owned Federal Reserve has been printing money like there's no tomorrow and now the price of everything is rising astronomically. This would not be so disastrous if people's wages were increasing as well but that has not been happening. Funding education is important but I don't think kicking people out of their homes to do so makes much sense."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire extend the renewable portfolio standard past 2025, requiring public utilities to obtain more than 25% of electricity from renewable energy sources?

"Only if doing so makes sense economically. I'd like to see more research into Molten Salt Reactors among other technologies."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire repeal the ban on abortion after 24 weeks gestation?

"Both sides of this issue have valid concerns. Personally, I would not want to abort a child of mine but I understand there are circumstances where doing so is necessary to save the life of the mother or the child might be afflicted by a serious birth defect. These are deep topics that require much reflection. What I would like to see is more private entities (churches, community groups, etc.) step up to support mothers who are considering an abortion. Using armed men to prevent abortions will only drive desperate mothers underground and into dangerous situations. We need to address this issue from multiple angles. And this requires all of us to step forward if we want to see a change in the status quo."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire guarantee the right to access abortion before 24 weeks?

"Both sides of this issue have valid concerns. Personally, I would not want to abort a child of mine but I understand there are circumstances where doing so is necessary to save the life of the mother or the child might be afflicted by a serious birth defect. These are deep topics that require much reflection. What I would like to see is more private entities (churches, community groups, etc.) step up to support mothers who are considering an abortion. Using armed men to prevent abortions will only drive desperate mothers underground and into dangerous situations. We need to address this issue from multiple angles. And this requires all of us to step forward if we want to see a change in the status quo."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?

"NEVER!"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should the state do more to encourage municipalities to remove zoning barriers to housing development?

"I would like to see more tiny homes encouraged. There have been a number of new developments that make them more environmentally friendly than conventional homes. From what I've heard septic and overburdening the local schools are the primary reasons people oppose more development. Septic concerns can be alleviated through the use of biogas technologies. Human and food waste can be placed inside of an oxygen free envirornment, which is basically a big balloon, and through bacteria produce methane gas usable for cooking fuel. As far as straining the local schools I propose enacting legislation that would make tiny home communities agree to provide adequate educational opportunities separate from the local school district. There are a number of exciting educational options available including: Public Charter Schools Public Magnet Schools Private Schools Online Schools Home Schooling Learning Pods A child's education is too important to be left to bureaucrats. Parent's must be able to choose the learning environment best suited to their children's needs."

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