Skip to main content

Current office:

NH House Rockingham County District 32 (Floterial)

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse from the 2018 election through July 2020. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. "Prime sponsored bills that became law" include bill texts that were incorporated into "omnibus" bills following the coronavirus emergency.

Session days attended
97% Present
Average 91%
Party unity score/partisanship
94% With Party
Average 94%
Participated in official roll call votes
92% Roll Call Votes
Average 86%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
4 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 3
Prime sponsored bills that became law
1 Became Law
Average 1

Voting Record

HB 1 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill.

HB 105 (2019)

Generally repeals the voter registration changes passed in SB 3. For example, this bill removes the stricter requirements for voters who register within 30 days of an election. This bill also removes much of the new language on voter registration forms about domicile. This bill also removes the authority of the secretary of state to conduct post-election voter registration investigations, leaving that to the attorney general.

HB 109 (2019)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks. Also requires private sales or transfers to go through a licensed firearm dealer, if it’s not absolutely clear that both the owner and the recipient are allowed to own guns.

HB 1166 (2020)

Establishes a committee to study the demographics of the uninsured population in New Hampshire, the barriers to obtaining healthcare coverage, and possible solutions to extend health insurance coverage. The Senate completely amended the bill to add various requirements and protections for employers and employees related to the coronavirus. For example, the amended bill allows employees to collect unemployment if they cannot go to work because they or a family member is sick with COVID-19 - even if Gov. Sununu ends the state of emergency.

HB 1247 (2020)

Requires landlords to provide at least 90 days notice before a rent increase over 5%. The House amended the bill to require 60 days notice for an increase over 5% and 90 days notice for an increase over 8%. The Senate amended the bill to instead remove the requirement of an eviction notice before public welfare departments provide rental assistance. The amended bill also "creates a duty of good faith and fair dealing for mortgage lenders." Lastly, the amended bill requires landlords to offer tenants a 6-month repayment plan for rent missed during the coronavirus emergency.

HB 1264 (2020)

Extends the Commission on the Seacoast Cancer Investigation from 2020 to 2022. The Senate amended the legislation to incorporate several bills related to PFAS. In particular, the amended bill establishes maximum contaminant levels for perflourinated compounds (PFCs), as originally written in SB 287.

HB 1280 (2020)

Caps how much health insurers can charge consumers for insulin at $100 for a 30-day supply. The Senate amended the bill to instead cap the payment at $30 for a 30-day supply.

HB 1454 (2020)

Gives local school boards the power to determine whether to grant academic credit for alternative extended learning and work-based programs. At the time of this bill's submission, that power lies with the state board of education. The Senate amended the bill to still require the state board of education to vet and approve alternative extended learning and work-based programs, which local school boards "may" accept for credit (similar to a different bill, SB 514).

HB 1577 (2020)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. Parental permission is required if a minor seeks a birth certificate change. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate.

HB 1645 (2020)

Extends the waiting period to annul a misdemeanor domestic violence offense, from 3 to 10 years. The Senate amended the bill to incorporate several other pieces of legislation.

HB 1648 (2020)

Permits adults to possess up to 3/4 of an ounce of cannabis, 5 grams of hashish, and other cannabis-infused products, and permits adults to grow up to 6 cannabis plants at home in a secure location that is not visible from other properties. This bill also allows adults to give marijuana products away and sell marijuana accessories.

HB 1664 (2020)

Requires the Department of Environmental Services to establish a climate action plan, an office of the environmental advocate, and an oversight commission on environmental services. The House amended the bill to instead establish greenhouse gas emission reduction goals for the state. Those goals are a 20% reduction in statewide emissions by 2025, 50% by 2035, and 80% by 2050 (all compared to 1990 emissions). The amended bill also gives the Department of Environmental Services the authority to develop and update regularly a climate action plan.

HB 1672 (2020)

Allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, whether or not he or she will actually be absent on election day. The Senate amended the bill to become the "Coronavirus Election Protection Act of 2020." The amended bill allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, allows town officials to start processing ballots before Election Day, and authorizes online voter registration.

HB 2 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill (part 2).

HB 365 (2019)

Increases the electric generating capacity of customer generators who may participate in net energy metering, generally from 1 megawatt to 5 megawatts.

HB 446 (2019)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate. The Senate amended the bill, for example to require the permission of a parent or guardian if a minor seeks a birth certificate change.

HB 455 (2019)

Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole.

HB 481 (2019)

Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. A Cannabis Control Commission, similar to the Liquor Commission, would be responsible for licensing and enforcement. The bill also allows limited home-growing of marijuana for personal use.

HB 514 (2019)

Establishes a seven day waiting period for the delivery of a firearm. There are some exceptions for rifle or shotgun purchases by hunters, law enforcement officers, and members of the armed forces. The Senate amended the bill, shortening the waiting period to three days.

HB 558 (2019)

Prohibits food service businesses from providing a single-use plastic straw to a customer unless specifically requested.

HB 564 (2019)

Makes it a misdemeanor to carry a firearm in a safe school zone. ˙There are some exceptions, for example if a person gets permission from the school board. The House amended the bill so that parents do not need to remove or unload firearms in their cars when picking up students. The amendment also specifically bans firearms on "school property" rather than in "school zones." School property includes buildings, grounds, school buses, and vans.

HB 685 (2019)

Prohibits balance billing for ambulance services. The bill also limits reimbursement for ambulance services to a "commercially reasonable value." The Senate amended the bill to instead require insurance plans which cover maternity benefits to provide coverage for emergency or elective abortion services (similar to SB 486).

HB 687 (2019)

Establishes "extreme risk protection orders," based on evidence that there is "a significant risk of causing bodily injury to himself or herself or others," which would require the subject of the order to surrender any firearms to law enforcement.

HB 706 (2019)

Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by the secretary of state after a public application process that includes input from legislative leaders. The Senate amended the bill, generally giving the Secretary of State less say in the process.

HB 712 (2019)

Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.

HB 731 (2019)

Gradually raises the state minimum wage, starting at $12 per hour in 2020 and ending at $15 per hour in 2024. The bill also raises the tipped minimum wage, although in 2024 it would still be 45% of the regular minimum wage. The bill requires cost of living adjustments every year. This bill also allows cities and towns to set a higher minimum wage. Lastly, this bill establishes a "training wage," no lower than $8.50, for employees under age eighteen for the first three months of employment.

SB 1 (2019)

Establishes a paid family and medical leave insurance program, which would be run by the state department of employment security. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. The bill does not allow anyone to opt-out of the program.

SB 10 (2019)

Increases the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020, then to $11 in 2022, except starting that year, employers would have to pay at least $12 per hour if they do not offer at least 10 paid sick days to employees.  The House and Senate amended the bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020 and $12 per hour in 2022, regardless of sick time.

SB 290 (2019)

Modifies the work and community engagement requirements for the Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. For example, this bill extends the work requirement exemption for parents so that parents of children under age 13 are eligible for the exemption. This bill also gives the Department of Health and Human Services the authority to waive the work requirement until July 2021 if there is an inability to communicate with program participants.

Position on Issues

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire government do more to increase the supply of affordable housing?

"I think the way to more affordable housing is to address the reason for the high rental costs; high property taxes. As education related costs are the major expenditure for most cities and towns, our efforts should be focused on lowering the costs associated with educating our children while maintaining high standards."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment?

"New Hampshire should increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?

"As with all of my previous answers, my first question is who is going to pay for it? Expanding the commuter rail would be great but to ask the taxpayers of New Hampshire to pay for it when only a small minority of them would use it is wrong."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?

"I oppose stricter gun control laws."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?

"New Hampshire has no money to increase funding for anything. A more accurate phrasing of this question would be 'should businesses charge more for their goods and services and should towns increase property taxes for heroin treatment programs?' My answer is to first find a treatment method that shows long term success and then find the actual cost. Continuously throwing the peoples money into programs that do not produce real results is not a good stewardship of their resources. If such a program is found to be demonstrably a sound investment then it should be presented to the people for their opinions. I do however feel that more money should be spent stopping heroin from coming into our state. If it is still available we are just spinning our wheels waiting for the next batch of addicts. Admittedly, this is a federal issue to start and since it is, more cases should be prosecuted federally to relieve the burden on our state's criminal justice system. I also believe that a strong economy and full employment are also equally as important as interdiction and treatment. Hopelessness is a path to addiction. A good paying job and a purpose in life is a path to success and a happy life."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?

"I oppose using state law-enforcement to enforce federal law but I do support full cooperation between state, local and federal law-enforcement to identify and remove illegal aliens. I also support requesting that the US Attorney take jurisdiction on all drug trafficking crimes where out of state residents are involved."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH add an income tax on earned income?

"I oppose New Hampshire adding an income tax on earned income."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?

"I support marijuana legalization."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?

"While providing insurance opportunity to low income people is an absolute necessity, it is best carried out through private insurers. Being a patient of the VA, I can tell you from first hand experience that the Government does not do healthcare well. Deregulation such as allowing insurers to cross state lines will make it more competitive. If we had the money to fund this expansion, it would be wonderful to do so but we don't. More than half of every dollar spend by the federal government is borrowed. That is no way to run a state or country. Again, this is a very complex issue but it is solvable if the parties work together."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"I support a ban on abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Is police brutality an issue in NH?

"I think that police brutality is an issue wherever and whenever it happens but I will not make a blanket indictment of all the hard working men and women of the NH law enforcement community by saying it is a problem for NH. Having said that, I do endorse the use of body cameras as they have proven to protect both the public and the officers who use them."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?

"I oppose New Hampshire's participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire maintain the renewable portfolio standard, which requires public utilities in New Hampshire to obtain a certain percentage of electricity from renewable energy sources (25% by 2025)?

"I support renewable energy and believe government should incentivize its use and study but I am against government mandates. Mandates invariably cost money that will only be passed on to the consumer. This is a form of regressive taxation through proxy."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?

"I oppose New Hampshire adding a broad-based sales tax."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?

"This is an extremely complex issue. First and foremost, it is important to understand that New Hampshire and its subdivisions are representative governments. As such they have no money of their own other than what they take from their citizens through taxation. These funds are to be used for purposes of the common good. If the people decide that a government is no longer fulfilling the task that it has taken money to do, the people are free to, through their vote, reallocate those funds. So I believe that if the people decide that the money should follow the child, I would support that and would likewise support legislation to carry it out."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?

"Standardized testing is not in and of itself a bad thing but high stakes testing that is tied to funding is wrong. It puts undue pressure on teachers and students to do well on the test at all cost and often results in 'teaching to the test'. Education time is better spent educating."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

"I support term limits for New Hampshire elected officials."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?

"New Hampshire should impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote."

Thank you to our sponsors and donors