Skip to main content

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse in 2023 and 2024. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. Gov. Sununu is still in the process of signing and vetoing 2024 bills, so the number of prime sponsored bills that became law may increase.

Session days attended
100% Present
Average 95%
Party unity score/partisanship
91% With Party
Average 94%
Participated in official roll call votes
93% Roll Call Votes
Average 93%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
11 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 3
Prime sponsored bills that became law
2 Became Law

Voting Record

CACR 23 (2024)

Constitutional amendment creating a right to abortion, including a ban on any restrictions on abortion prior to 24 weeks.

HB 10 (2023)

Establishes a parental bill of rights. Some of the parental rights in this bill include:
"The right to direct the education and care of his or her minor child"
"The right to be physically present at any health care facility ... at which their minor child is receiving hospital care"
"The right to consent in writing before a biometric scan of his or her minor child is made, shared, or stored"

HB 106 (2023)

Establishes a procedure for issuing "extreme risk protection orders" to protect against persons who pose an immediate risk of harm to themselves or others. An extreme risk protection order would restrict a person's access to firearms, and is also known as a "red flag law."

HB 1145 (2024)

Prohibits new solid waste landfill permits in the state for facilities owned by any person other than the state of New Hampshire or a political subdivision thereof.

HB 1205 (2024)

Prohibits anyone with the reproductive biology and genetics of a male at birth from participating on school sports teams designated for females. As introduced, this bill covered K-12 schools as well as the university and community college system. The House amended the bill so that it only applies to middle and high schools.

HB 1248 (2024)

Changes the state limit on abortion after 24 weeks gestation to 15 days gestation.

HB 1283 (2024)

Establishes a procedure for an individual with terminal illness to receive medical assistance in dying through the self administration of medication (sometimes called physician-assisted suicide). The bill establishes criteria for the prescription of such medication and establishes reporting requirements and penalties for misuse or noncompliance.

HB 1291 (2024)

Increases the number of accessory dwelling units (ADUs) allowed by right from one to two. This bill also increases the maximum square footage from 750 square feet to 1,000 square feet (and 850 square feet for a second unit). The bill then sets other regulations municipalities can and cannot require for ADUs. For example, the bill states that municipalities may require a property to have at least one half acre to have more than one ADU.

HB 1322 (2024)

Gradually increases the minimum wage to $17 per hour by 2029. This bill then allows future increases best on the Northeast Consumer Price Index. This bill also increases the tipped minimum wage from 45% to 50% of the regular minimum wage.

HB 1377 (2024)

Right-to-work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union.

HB 1400 (2024)

Prohibits zoning and planning regulations that set maximum residential parking spaces above one parking space per unit.

HB 1419 (2024)

Prohibits K-12 schools from making "any material that is harmful to minors" available to students. The bill defines this material to include various content related to sex. This bill also requires school boards to adopt complaint resolution policies to address complaints regarding harmful material by parents or guardians.

HB 1633 (2024)

Legalizes and regulates recreational marijuana sales to adults over age twenty-one. As amended by the House, this bill would allow the state to license fifteen cannabis retail outlets. There would be a 10% tax on monthly total gross revenue derived from the sale of cannabis and cannabis products. Smoking in public and consuming marijuana while driving would be illegal. Towns could limit marijuana businesses.

HB 1649 (2024)

Restricts the use of per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in consumer products. For example, this bill bans the sale of cosmetics, food packing, carpets, and more products with added PFAS starting July 1, 2028. The House changed that date to January 1, 2027.

The Senate amended the bill to also state that settlement funds from PFAS lawsuits will be deposited in the drinking water and groundwater trust fund and used to fund public water systems impacted by PFAS.

HB 1656 (2024)

Greatly increases the per-pupil state education funding for each student receiving special education services. The House amended the bill to establish three weighted categories for special education differentiated aid, with more funding going to students who need more services.

HB 1665 (2024)

Raises the annual household income limit to qualify for the Education Freedom Account (EFA) program, from 350% to 500% of the federal poverty level (from about $100,000 to about $150,000 for a family of four).

The Senate rewrote the bill. The Senate version of the bill raises eligibility to just 400% of the federal poverty level, and extends the timeline for phase-out grants for public schools when students leave to use EFA program funds, from 2026 to 2029. These changes are similar to SB 442, a bill killed in the House.

HB 1711 (2024)

Establishes a system to report to the firearm background check system if a person is found not guilty by reason of insanity, not competent to stand trial, or involuntarily committed to a mental health facility. This bill also allows the court to order a person to surrender their firearms in these circumstances. This bill also establishes a process for a person to have their record removed from the background check system after six months, if they are no longer a danger to themselves or others.

HB 2 (2023)

State budget bill (part 2). The governor presented his proposal for the next state budget February 14. The House and Senate both made changes to that proposal. Click here to read a summary of the 2023 budget process.

HB 208 (2023)

Establishes greenhouse gas emission reduction goals for the state, to net zero by 2050. This bill also requires the Department of Environmental Services to develop a climate action plan by July 1, 2024, that includes evaluation of best available information, considers inclusion of strategies, programs and compliance mechanisms with measurable goals and targets, considers opportunities to encourage investment in low/moderate income, rural and minority communities, makes recommendations on retraining and apprenticeship opportunities, and coordinates with other state agencies.

HB 224 (2023)

Repeals the civil and criminal penalties for health care providers who violate the state's ban on abortion after 24 weeks.

HB 367 (2023)

Increases the maximum household income limit for participation in the Education Freedom Account program, from 300% to 500% of the federal poverty guidelines. The Education Freedom Account program allows families to spend the state's per-pupil share of education funding on private or home school expenses.

The House amended the bill to only increase the income limit to 350% of the federal poverty guidelines.

HB 470 (2023)

Exempts some drug checking equipment from the definition of drug paraphernalia, and allows the use of drug checking equipment, such as fentanyl test strips, for harm reduction.

HB 523 (2023)

Increases the maximum electric generating capacity to participate in net energy metering, from one to five megawatts. This bill also modifies the transition of tariffs applicable to some customer-generators.

HB 557 (2023)

Removes the authority of the Department of Health and Human Services to require vaccinations beyond those in state law. This bill specifically notes that the requirements for chickenpox, Hepatitis B, and Hib vaccinations will expire in 2026.

HB 567 (2023)

Requires at least 30 days written notice for a rent increase. Large, multi-unit rental owners must provide at least 60 days notice. If the rent increase is over 15%, large multi-unit landlords must provide at least 6 months notice.

HB 57 (2023)

Gradually raises the minimum wage to $15 per hour over the next three years, with future adjustments based on the consumer price index. This bill also raises the tipped minimum wage from 45% to 50% of the regular minimum wage. Lastly, this bill allows a minimum wage of $8 per hour for youth under age 18 for the first six months of employment.

HB 59 (2023)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks.

HB 619 (2023)

Prohibits gender transition care for minors under age 18. This bill also prohibits teaching about gender identity in public schools (with an exception for high school psychology courses), requires schools to use the name and gender that students are enrolled as, prohibits students from participating on sports teams that do not correspond to their biological sex at birth, and requires students to use the bathroom that corresponds with their biological sex at birth.

HB 624 (2023)

Requires state and local law enforcement to notify the public before an immigration checkpoint.

HB 639 (2023)

Legalizes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. The bill allows limited home-growing of marijuana. A new Cannabis Commission would oversee licensing and regulations related to the manufacture, testing, and sale of legal marijuana. Cannabis sales would be taxed under the Meals and Rooms tax system. Alternative Treatment Centers, which currently serve the state's medical marijuana patients, would be allowed to apply for a "dual use certificate" that allows them to participate in recreational marijuana business. Towns could limit marijuana businesses.

SB 263 (2023)

Permanently reauthorizes the New Hampshire Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. Previous law ended the program on December 31, 2023. This bill also reestablishes and revises the commission to evaluate the New Hampshire Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid.

SB 272 (2023)

Establishes a parental bill of rights in education. Some of the parental rights in this bill include:
"The right to access and review all medical records of a child maintained by a school or school personnel"
"The right to inquire of the school or school personnel and to be truthfully and completely informed if the child is being identified or referred to by school district staff, as being of a gender other than that of which the child was identified or referred when enrolled"

Position on Issues

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Do you support the “Education Freedom Account” program, which gives students access to the per-pupil share of state school funding to spend on private school or home school expenses?

"This program is wonderful for the children of New Hampshire. The only people who don't like it are the teacher's unions. They have for so long bread mediocrity in their ranks that they cannot tolerate scrutiny and competition. If the public school is the best place for children to go then parents will not remove their children and send them elsewhere. The very popularity of this program shows the public dissatisfaction of the current public school model. In New Hampshire we cherish education of children not institutions. Whatever the best educational environment for the child is, is exactly where the child belongs and the money should follow the child. Furthermore, with the teachers unions becoming more politicized and insisting on teaching controversial concepts and theories to children that go against the values of the families in the community, is driving greater demand for programs like this. I firmly believe that the best thing for public education is competition. Monopolies are bad for business in the world of economics and bad for children in the world of education. Children belong to their parents and not the state."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire ban abortions during the first trimester (e.g. after 6 weeks gestation)?

"The current laws regarding access to abortion are more lenient than most European countries and equal to or more lenient than most American states. On New Hampshire woman has the ability to choose to keep or terminate her pregnancy up to 6 months. After 6 months it becomes a question of whether or not continuing the pregnancy would be a danger to the mother or if there is evidence of a fatal fetal anomaly which would result in the child not being able to survive at birth. The people of New Hampshire have expressed that the current laws are where they would like to stay. Terminating the life of a child that could survive outside of the womb is no longer about a woman's right to choose, It is about state sanctioned barbarism. A fetus at 6 months gestation is a fully formed human being with the ability to feel pain, respond to the sound of its mothers voice and many other amazing things. Killing this child because allowing it to be born would be inconvenient to the mother can only be described as an act of savagery and unbefitting a civilized society."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire ban abortions during the second trimester (e.g. after 15 weeks gestation)?

"The current laws regarding access to abortion are more lenient than most European countries and equal to or more lenient than most American states. On New Hampshire woman has the ability to choose to keep or terminate her pregnancy up to 6 months. After 6 months it becomes a question of whether or not continuing the pregnancy would be a danger to the mother or if there is evidence of a fatal fetal anomaly which would result in the child not being able to survive at birth. The people of New Hampshire have expressed that the current laws are where they would like to stay. Terminating the life of a child that could survive outside of the womb is no longer about a woman's right to choose, It is about state sanctioned barbarism. A fetus at 6 months gestation is a fully formed human being with the ability to feel pain, respond to the sound of its mothers voice and many other amazing things. Killing this child because allowing it to be born would be inconvenient to the mother can only be described as an act of savagery and unbefitting a civilized society."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban discussions about sexual orientation and gender identity in grades K-3?

"K-3 is actually not enough. K-12 is more appropriate. The teaching of issues related to morals and sexuality belongs exclusively to the parents. They and they alone know what and when their children are ready to learn about in this regard. This is especially true when current education is resulting in vast swaths of our children unable to read, write, and do arithmetic at their grade level. The schools need to focus on teaching real pronouns before it ventures into fictional ones."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the state law that bans teaching certain concepts, such as the idea that people may be "inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously"?

"When the law mandates education, it must ensure that what it teaches is in keeping with the Constition. Namely, that all people are created equal and that in our society equal opportunity is guaranteed but not equal outcome. What we make of the opportunity is equal to what we put into it. No one is inherently good or bad. Hard work is necessary to be successful regardless of sex, race or religious affiliation."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should NH add an income tax on earned income?

"Our lack of an income tax allows our citizens to take home more of their hard earned pay, which they then return back into our economy through purchases of goods and services."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?

"Our lack of a sales tax continues to play an important part in keeping New Hampshire an affordable place to live, as well as attracting consumers from surrounding states to make expensive purchases. This in turn helps support our retail businesses and the jobs they create."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire add a tax credit for businesses that contribute to student loan repayment for employees?

"This is a good example of a public/private partnership that benefits everyone."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire lower business taxes?

"Generally, I support keeping business taxes competitive enough to attract more businesses to the state. That being said, we must keep a close eye on many other factors prior to lowering. These include but are not limited to continuing to fund critic services, the status of our pension debt liabilities. Clear eyed tax relief for business is a good thing when done responsibly."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire government do more to address climate change?

"If anything is to be done to protect our environment from man-made pollutants it must be done at a national level and multilational level. Attempting to impact the outcome on a piecemeal state-by-state basis will do little to help the climate but do much to hurt our individual citizens."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Do you support giving voters who register without ID on Election Day a ballot that only counts if they return identifying documents to the state before a deadline?

"While this is the current state of the law, the mere idea that there is somewhere out there a human being with no identification is ludicrous. The ability to vote is one of the most important rights in our Republic. Even one vote cast fraudulently steals the right of the person who cast it legally. There should be universal identification required to vote."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire add a fee or mileage charge for electric vehicle owners to help pay for transportation and/or electric infrastructure?

"All vehicles should pay for the upkeep of the roads they use."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should the state do more to encourage municipalities to remove zoning barriers to housing development?

"I believe there are ways to encourage localities to open up more ability to create new housing, without infringing in local control of the people's right to determine the kind and size of the community that they reside in. I think that all ideas should be explored including public/private partnerships. There is no doubt we require more housing and cities and towns know this better than anyone, but fears of too many new residents putting greater demand on already overburdened schools, law enforcement and other local services, are legitimate. Programs such as service bonding for larger developments have been successful in other states and may be worth exploring. The first step to resolving any issue is to work closely with the stakeholders from the beginning vs. a top down mandate."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire extend the renewable portfolio standard past 2025, requiring public utilities to obtain more than 25% of electricity from renewable energy sources?

"The government should not require anything that drives up the cost of energy for consumers. When and if renewable emery becomes efficient and cost effective, the free market will demand it just like every new innovation that has come before. No new innovation has ever come from government."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire guarantee the right to access abortion before 24 weeks?

"The current laws regarding access to abortion are more lenient than most European countries and equal to or more lenient than most American states. On New Hampshire woman has the ability to choose to keep or terminate her pregnancy up to 6 months. After 6 months it becomes a question of whether or not continuing the pregnancy would be a danger to the mother or if there is evidence of a fatal fetal anomaly which would result in the child not being able to survive at birth. The people of New Hampshire have expressed that the current laws are where they would like to stay. Terminating the life of a child that could survive outside of the womb is no longer about a woman's right to choose, It is about state sanctioned barbarism. A fetus at 6 months gestation is a fully formed human being with the ability to feel pain, respond to the sound of its mothers voice and many other amazing things. Killing this child because allowing it to be born would be inconvenient to the mother can only be described as an act of savagery and unbefitting a civilized society."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the option of mail-in ballots for all voters, not just absentees?

"As we have seen, unfettered access to our election system leads to fraud. The right to vote should be easy to exercise but it must also be protected. Every fraudulent votes negates the vote of a legal voter. If you can leave your home for any reason, you can vote in person. If you cannot, the absentee system has you covered."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Do you support New Hampshire’s current system of public school funding, with about two-thirds of total funding coming from local property taxes?

"This is perhaps the one area where I would support a broad-based sales tax. A broad-based sales tax with a constitutional amendment revoking local property tax for education. In other states where they have implemented sales tax or income tax for the purpose of funding education have always resulted in both the new tax and the property tax remaining. If we were to institute one the other must then be permanently revoked. This would also require that educator union contracts being negotiated centrally at the state level if the state is paying for the cost of education. I do not foresee teacher unions agree to this and until they do nothing will change. With New Hampshire cities and towns consistently raising their education taxes year after year, we are literally taxing our most vulnerable citizens out of their homes. The school boards are almost always populated by younger citizens with children and more dynamic incomes. Little thought is ever given to the senior citizen on a fixed income who cannot afford double digit increases in their taxes year after year when they're only income is social security which very rarely gets above two or three percent a year in the cost of living increase. The system is set up to pit families with children against families without. I believe a broad-based sales tax could ensure that everyone participated in public education costs without forcing the disabled and elderly out of their homes."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by allowing home-growing and private use without sales?

"With our country suffering from over a decade of opioid and other substance abuse problems, the idea of the state actually selling mind-altering drugs for the public is abhorrent. The first role of government is the safety of its citizens. We spend millions of taxpayer dollars on programs to divert young people from drug use. For us to then turn around and not only say this drug use is acceptable, but actually sell it is hypocritical beyond description."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by licensing growers and private retail locations?

"With our country suffering from over a decade of opioid and other substance abuse problems, the idea of the state actually selling mind-altering drugs for the public is abhorrent. The first role of government is the safety of its citizens. We spend millions of taxpayer dollars on programs to divert young people from drug use. For us to then turn around and not only say this drug use is acceptable, but actually sell it is hypocritical beyond description."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by establishing state-run cannabis stores?

"With our country suffering from over a decade of opioid and other substance abuse problems, the idea of the state actually selling mind-altering drugs for the public is abhorrent. The first role of government is the safety of its citizens. We spend millions of taxpayer dollars on programs to divert young people from drug use. For us to then turn around and not only say this drug use is acceptable, but actually sell it is hypocritical beyond description."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire raise the minimum wage?

"The free market gets this right. The concept often cited by Democrats is that no one should work full time and be unable to sustain themselves on that pay. This is a Marxist ideology. In free market capitalism, the need for the particular skill vs the people who possess it, drives the amount of the wage for it. This incentivizes people to better themselves by acquiring higher education or skills that will command a higher wage. Take that incentive away and you end up with inflation and a large segment of society living in poverty and becoming reliant on government services, which is the goal of Marxism."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should the state permanently increase how much tax revenue it shares with towns and cities every year, beyond public school funding?

"Begging from Peter to pay Paul is no way to run a government. State revenue is not printed in the basement of the State House, it is confiscated from the people."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the gradual phase-out of the Interests and Dividends tax?

"Most Americans have come to rely on their 401k as an important part of their retirement. The money was taxed once when they earned it and they absorbed all of the risk when they invested it. Peoples savings are theirs and not the Government's piggy bank."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should New Hampshire repeal the ban on abortion after 24 weeks gestation?

"The current laws regarding access to abortion are more lenient than most European countries and equal to or more lenient than most American states. On New Hampshire woman has the ability to choose to keep or terminate her pregnancy up to 6 months. After 6 months it becomes a question of whether or not continuing the pregnancy would be a danger to the mother or if there is evidence of a fatal fetal anomaly which would result in the child not being able to survive at birth. The people of New Hampshire have expressed that the current laws are where they would like to stay. Terminating the life of a child that could survive outside of the womb is no longer about a woman's right to choose, It is about state sanctioned barbarism. A fetus at 6 months gestation is a fully formed human being with the ability to feel pain, respond to the sound of its mothers voice and many other amazing things. Killing this child because allowing it to be born would be inconvenient to the mother can only be described as an act of savagery and unbefitting a civilized society."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2024

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?

"If this question or changed to say ' should New Hampshire pass stricter laws on the freedom of speech? ', it would not even be asked on this survey. Why? Because the freedom of speech is a right guaranteed by our Constitution. Just like the right to keep in bear arms. We do not tolerate the passing of laws to weaken constitutional rights. If the right itself is deemed by the majority of the population to be wrong, then there is a mechanism in place to change that right by amending the Constitution."

Thank you to our sponsors and donors