2019-2020 BILL SUMMARIES

New Hampshire legislators will likely consider around 1,800 bills in 2019 and 2020. Our analysts read every single one of them and summarize them in plain language so you can easily discover what's really up for debate.

Browse the list of all available bills below, organized by category. We're adding new bill summaries as soon as the text of the bills is available for us to read.

Our issue pages also show summaries of all bills related to each issue, along with their current status in the Legislature.  Browse our issue list.

CRIME & PUBLIC SAFETY
Gun laws, marijuana decriminalization, and the death penalty are some of the many issues included in this category.

SB 109 (2019)
Authorizes the state fire marshal to detail personnel for public or private events for the purpose of law enforcement, code enforcement, hazardous materials safety, and public education services. Detail work is typically reimbursed by outside entities.
SB 112 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study procedures governing the hiring and payment of bail bondsmen.
SB 118 (2019)
Establishes a standing child fatality review committee.
SB 126 (2019)
Makes minor changes to the procedure for determining a defendant's competency to stand trial. For example, this bill requires that if a court finds a defendant has regained competency, the court must schedule a trial within 60 days. This bill also replaces references to "involuntary commitment" with "involuntary admission."
SB 129 (2019)
If a misdemanor charge is filed directly in superior court, this bill repeals the presumption that any unclassified misdemeanor is Class B.
SB 130 (2019)
Establishes two attorney positions in the cold case homicide unit in the Department of Justice to work exclusively on unsolved murders in the state.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 133 (2019)
Adds transportation and field services vehicles of the Department of Corrections to the general definition of "emergency vehicle."
SB 141 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study violence against school personnel.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 170 (2019)
Appropriates $1,155,000 to hire five state troopers assigned to drug enforcement on the state border. This bill also appropriates $3,340,000 for state and local law enforcement and the state lab for overtime related to drug enforcement.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 173 (2019)
Requires the Division of State Police maintain an electronic database of criminal records accessible to the public. This bill similarly removes the requirement for a person to give notarized, written permission for another to view his or her criminal history.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 182 (2019)
Requires a person to report when another person "has suffered or is exposed to grave physical harm," subject to a $100 fine.
More Info | Sponsor: John Reagan
SB 210 (2019)
Adds a definition of "telecommunicators" to the law governing emergency medical and trauma services.
SB 212 (2019)
Clarifies the requirements for issuance of a driver's license with limited driving privileges. For example, this bill clarifies that an ignition interlock device must be installed in the vehicle for the duration of the limited privilege as well as one year immediately following full restoration of driving privileges.
SB 220 (2019)
Enables the Department of Transportation to access crash data maintained by the department of safety, local law enforcement, and other government agencies.
SB 237 (2019)
Rewrites the law allowing the state to require defendants to cover the costs of a public defender, in particular to limit reimbursement to cases when the person is found guilty.
SB 239 (2019)
Establishes a blue alert system in New Hampshire to share information when a law enforcement officer has been killed, injured, or goes missing in the line of duty.  The blue alert system would be similar to the "Amber Alert" system.
SB 246 (2019)
Modifies the criminal background check process for child care programs so they match the federal requirements of the Child Care and Development Fund Program. Specifically, this bill requires background checks be submitted directly to the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) prior to being forwarded to the Department of Safety, grants DHHS the authority to request additional records in certain instances, and allows DHHS to suspend an individual's eligibility to work in a child care program if the individual is charged with a disqualifying crime while charges are pending.  
More Info | Sponsor: James Gray
SB 253 (2019)
Requires the Department of Safety to establish a statewide, real-time threat notification system for the purpose of allowing school personnel to notify law enforcement officials directly in the event of a direct threat against a school community.
SB 262 (2019)
Clarifies that any personal information found in abandoned belongings "is the property of the individual to whom it pertains regardless of its abandonment," and cannot be collected or used for any purpose. There are exceptions for law enforcement and other government officials with a warrant or at a crime scene.
SB 297 (2019)
Extends the deadline for arraignments from 24 to 36 hours.
SB 298 (2019)
Enacts a procedure to secure the attendance of a witness from Massachusetts to testify in a criminal trial in New Hampshire. A court clerk could issue a certificate to present to a justice of the peace in Massachusetts, who could compel the witness to travel to New Hampshire. This bill establishes compensation for the witness's travel. This bill also establishes that a New Hampshire justice of the peace shall issue a summons for a New Hampshire resident to testify in a trial in a neighboring state if the justice is presented with the certificate from a clerk in that state.
SB 299 (2019)
Revises the form a law enforcement officer presents to a person upon arresting them for a misdemeanor or violation, clarifying that the person must "remain of good behavior" to stay out of jail without bail.
SB 311 (2019)
Prohibits a fee for annuling an arrest and court record when a person is found not guilty or is not prosecuted. The Senate amended the bill to revise various other time periods before a person may petition for annulment. For example, the Senate amendment allows someone to petition for annulment while they are still paying restitution, if they can demonstrate they are indigent and therefore unable to pay. The Senate amendment also increases the time before someone can petition to annul a domestic violence conviction, but generally decreases the time someone must wait to petition to annul a drug possession offense.
SB 314 (2019)
Revises some of the bail reform law passed in 2018 that was intended to prevent incarcerating someone before trial solely because he or she cannot afford bail. For example, this bill requires a defendant to demonstrate that it is necessary for a victim to testify at a bail hearing before such testimony is included. This bill also establishes a bail reform coordinator in the Department of Justice and re-establishes the Commission on Pretrial Detention, Pretrial Scheduling, and Pretrial Services to evaluate the pretrial and bail process and recommend any legislative changes.
SB 316 (2019)
Makes it a crime to disclose a person's personal information - such as birthday or phone number - without the person's written consent. This would apply to service providers such as cell phone and social media companies, as well as individuals and the government. There is an exception for a government search warrant.
SB 34 (2019)
Defines "drive or attempt to drive" in the DUI law to exclude sleeping in a parked vehicle and any activity "lacking intent to control the vehicle in a manner which could pose a danger to the public."
SB 35 (2019)
Corrects a statutory reference in the law governing release of a defendant pending trial.
SB 50 (2019)
Clarifies that if a person elects to have a blood test to determine alcohol concentration, that test takes place after completing an infrared molecular absorption test requested by a law enforcement officer.
SB 51 (2019)
Establishes a commission to study the expansion of the mental health court system statewide.
More Info | Sponsor: Jon Morgan
SB 89 (2019)
Increases the penalty for looking into someone's private home or other private place "with no legitimate purpose" so that a second offense is a felony.
More Info | Sponsor: James Gray
SB 91 (2019)
Repeals some of the bail reform law passed in 2018 that was intended to prevent incarcerating someone before trial solely because he or she cannot afford bail. For example, this bill repeals some of the specific factors a court must consider when setting bail, such as if the person is the parent and sole caretaker of a child who might end up in state custody if the parent is incarcerated. The bill also directs the courts to consider a defendant's history of failing to appear at court hearings, and lowers the burden of proof in some cases for determining if a person would be dangerous if released pre-trial. The bill also states a victim "shall not be required to testify in a bail hearing."
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley

ECONOMY, BUDGET & TAXES
From this year's property taxes to next year's budget, this category includes issues related to taxpayer issues.

HB 252 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study labor laws and rules.
HB 253 (2019)
Prohibits an employer from asking a job applicant about his or her criminal history prior to an interview.
HB 254 (2019)
Caps how much operators may keep of meals and rooms tax revenue to $100 per month, and sends the revenue operators would otherwise keep to school building aid.
HB 255 (2019)
Requires an employer to pay a $2 per hour shift differential for employees working an overnight shift.
HB 259 (2019)
Requires building code violations for substandard workmanship or non-approved materials to include the relevant section of the state or local building code.
HB 262 (2019)
Provides that the quoted price for a home heating oil delivery shall be valid until the delivery occurs.
HB 265 (2019)
States, "no New Hampshire business retailer shall be required to collect sales or use taxes for a foreign government or provide any information for the facilitation of collecting these taxes unless such collection is mandated by the Congress of the United States."
HB 266 (2019)
Changes the residency requirement for the elderly property tax exemption from 3 to 10 consecutive years.
HB 268 (2019)
Allows a real estate broker to share a commission with an unlicensed entity, such as a limited liability company.
HB 270 (2019)
Requires that mortgage foreclosures be commenced by civil actions brought in superior court. This bill also modifies the period of redemption for a mortgage.
HB 271 (2019)
Removes persons carrying out surveying activities of engineering projects from the exemptions from licensure as a land surveyor.
HB 272 (2019)
Requires employers to provide various notifications and disclosures to temporary workers, such as a detailed description of the work to be performed.
HB 274 (2019)
Clarifies that the meals and rooms tax applies to motor vehicle rentals facilitated by an app, website, or other online system.
HB 285 (2019)
Declares that when approved by the insurance commissioner, workers' compensation rates are open to public inspection.
HB 293 (2019)
Prohibits employers from using credit history in employment decisions.
HB 294 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study the state law governing equal pay.
HB 303 (2019)
Requires local building code compliance inspectors to have certification or show sufficient knowledge of code compliance requirements.
HB 308 (2019)
Establishes a condominium dispute resolution board to resolve matters involving condominium associations and unit owners.
HB 309 (2019)
Modifies foreclosure procedures. In particular, this bill requires the sheriff to serve notice to the mortgagor. The bill also modifies the language in that notice to make clear the right of the mortgagor to file a complaint in superior court.
HB 312 (2019)
Defines tiny houses and lays out how municipalities may regulate tiny houses.
HB 328 (2019)
Repeals the New Hampshire Film and Television Commission in the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.
HB 336 (2019)
Requires a tenant to keep an address on file with the court following a judgment for the landlord for possession or damages. The bill also requires a defendant in a small claims case keep a current address on file with the court.
HB 337 (2019)
Makes some small changes to the laws regulating property and casualty insurance, as requested by the Insurance Department. For example, if the insurance commissioner rules that a reasonable degree of competition does not exist in the market, this bill extends that ruling from one year to two years.
HB 338 (2019)
Repeals the limits on rebating in Chapter 402 of state law (the current health insurance laws), and adds similar limits to Chapter 417 (the laws against unfair insurance trade practices).
HB 339 (2019)
Revises the insurance forms that must be approved by the state, excluding financial guaranty and boiler and machinery insurance. This bill also excludes mortgage guaranty and fiduciary liability insurance from some filing requirements, such as the requirement to file predictive models with the state. This bill was requested by the Insurance Department.
HB 340 (2019)
Adds recordkeeping requirements for managed asset trusts under the New Hampshire trust code.
HB 341 (2019)
Clarifies that the insurance commissioner does not need to disclose the attachments to a letter an insurer writes in response to a customer complaint.
HB 342 (2019)
Clarifies the confidentiality of reports and other information related to workers' compensation audits to the Department of Labor.
HB 346 (2019)
Defines and regulates noncompete agreements. In particular, this bill prohibits noncompete agreements for low wage employees.
More Info | Sponsor: David Meuse
HB 347 (2019)
Adds insurer's policy administration expenses to commercial rate standards.
More Info | Sponsor: John Hunt
HB 348 (2019)
Establishes meetings and insurance requirements for small condominiums with 25 or fewer residential units. This bill also determines how unit owners must share repair costs if a condominium association does not have a master casuality policy.
HB 351 (2019)
Increases the value of an automobile that is exempt from attachment, from $4,000 to $10,000.
More Info | Sponsor: Kurt Wuelper
HB 355 (2019)
Makes some changes to the regulation of real estate brokers and salespersons relating to criminal records checks, inactive status, reciprocity, prohibited conduct, and required information.
HB 367 (2019)
Establishes a state bank.
HB 376 (2019)
Establishes a commission to study best practices for companion animal groomers.
More Info | Sponsor: Tamara Le
HB 379 (2019)
Requires state employees to only use state-owned or state-provided information technology resources for the performance of state duties.
HB 387 (2019)
States, "Compliance with additional state or local building code requirements shall not be required for the issuance of a certificate of occupancy unless the occupancy classification has changed or unless the property is undergoing a substantial renovation."
HB 388 (2019)
If a municipality does not perform a code compliance inspection, this bill limits the administrative fee for a building permit to $25.
HB 389 (2019)
Requires the Department of Business and Economic Affairs to prepare materials for businesses relative to service dogs, including a window decal and an informational brochure about what questions a business owner may ask regarding a service animal. The House amended the bill to shift that responsibility from the Department of Business and Economic Affairs to the Secretary of State.
HB 390 (2019)
Lowers the commission paid to keno operators, from 8% to 5% of proceeds.
HB 392 (2019)
Requires the northern New Hampshire correctional facility to make a payment in lieu of taxes to the city of Berlin. The payment would go entirely to the Berlin school system.
More Info | Sponsor: Edith Tucker
HB 394 (2019)
Expands the definition of crop theft to include Christmas trees and consumption of a crop, and adds a $1,000 minimum penalty that must be paid to the victim. The House amended the bill to lower the minimum penalty to $500.
HB 402 (2019)
Repeals a requirement that a mortgagor post a notice of the anticipated funding date for the construction mortgage requisition at a construction jobsite.
HB 405 (2019)
Authorizes the sale of beer in refillable containers.
HB 406 (2019)
Requires an employer to report any serious injury or death to the Department of Labor within no more than 24 hours, and requires the Department of Labor to then inspect the place of employment.
HB 407 (2019)
Exempts antennas from real estate taxes.
HB 416 (2019)
Prohibits New Hampshire retailers from providing any private customer information to calculate sales tax in another state, county, or municipality.
HB 417 (2019)
Prohibits community associations from banning amateur radio antennas on property under the exclusive use or control of an individual.
HB 418 (2019)
Excludes emergency response and training by retired members working for municipal fire departments from the annual limitations on part-time employment. The House amended the bill to instead allow retired members whose part-time hours are already grandfathered under the law, to extend the grandfathering to a different position with the same participating employer.
HB 419 (2019)
Clarifies that the House Clerk is a full-time legislative employee eligible for fringe benefits.

EDUCATION
Curious about Common Core or school funding? Browse these issues related to education in the Granite State.

HB 575 (2019)
Establishes a commission to study establishing a code of ethics for school board members.
HB 626 (2019)
Increases the penalty for illegally overtaking or passing a school bus, from a fine of $250 to a fine of $1,000. This bill also allows a license suspension of 30 days on the first offense.
HB 632 (2019)
Ends the Interest and Dividends Tax credit for scholarship donations, and then repeals the entire education tax credit scholarship program in 2020.
HB 652 (2019)
Requires the state Board of Education to adopt rules requiring teachers and administrators in the public schools to receive annual training in suicide awareness and prevention.
More Info | Sponsor: Gates Lucas
HB 673 (2019)
Creates a scholarship program for students to pay for exams that translate into college credit, and sets aside $200,000 over two years for the scholarships.
HB 677 (2019)
Modifies the law regulating school suspensions and expulsions. For example, this bill decreases the maximum length of suspensions, and requires a school district to conduct a functional behavior assessment and implement a positive behavior intervention plan for any student suspended more than 10 days in any school year. This bill also establishes a grant program to help schools to implement the Multi-Tiered System of Supports for Behavioral Health and Wellness (MTSS-B), and sets aside $5 million for the grants.
More Info | Sponsor: Mel Myler
HB 678 (2019)
Increases the base per-pupil state funding from $3,561.27 to $9,929.00. The bill also adds extra per-pupil funding for a district's transportation costs. The Department of Education estimates this would increase state costs for local funding by roughly $1.1 billion a year.
HB 686 (2019)
Extends the interest and dividends tax to capital gains and increases the exemptions and filing thresholds for the interest and dividends tax. This bill then increases the base per-pupil state funding from $3,561.27 to $4,500.˙The bill eliminates extra aid for third grade students scoring below proficient in reading on statewide standardized tests. Lastly, the bill increases some stabilization grants for schools. The House amended the bill to only increase the base per-pupil state funding to $4,000. The House amendment also provides for a decrease in statewide property taxes.
More Info | Sponsor: Richard Ames
HB 709 (2019)
Increases the base per-pupil state funding to $3,709. The bill further increases per-pupil aid for students eligible for free or reduced lunch, ranging from $1,854 to $5,563, with more for schools with a higher percentage of low income students. The bill then creates "fiscal disparity aid" for districts with low local property tax revenue. To help pay for state aid to less wealthy districts, this bill requires some districts to pay "excess education property tax payments" to the state. The bill states no municipality will ever see a decrease in state education funding, and repeals the stabilization grant system currently used to limit funding decreases. Lastly, the bill revises the transportation requirement for pupils, for example to require mandatory transportation for kindergarten through grade 8, rather than grades 1 through 8, for students who live more than two miles from school. The House amended the bill to remove the overall increase in base per-pupil funding, the requirement to pay "excess education property tax payments" to the state, and the revised transportation requirements.
HB 711 (2019)
Increases the base per-pupil state funding from $3,561.27 to a range of $4,900 to $7,000, depending on the size of the municipality. Larger municipalities would receive lower per-pupil funding. The bill makes no significant changes to per-pupil aid for students eligible for free or reduced lunch, English language learners, and special education students; the bill eliminates extra aid for third grade students scoring below proficient in reading on statewide standardized tests. ˙This bill increases the biennial adjustment in per-pupil funding based on the consumer price index. The bill repeals the stabilization grant system that currently provides additional funding to some towns with that would otherwise see funding decreases. The bill also eliminates extra per-pupil funding for charter schools, although those schools would be eligible for the same increased base per-pupil funding as all other schools determined using charter school enrollment.
HB 713 (2019)
Increases the base per-pupil state funding to $3,897. The bill further increases per-pupil aid for students eligible for free or reduced lunch; the bill eliminates extra aid for third grade students scoring below proficient in reading on statewide standardized tests. ˙The bill repeals the stabilization grant system currently used to limit funding decreases, and creates a new grant program for districts with low local property tax revenue. Lastly, this bill revises transportation requirements for pupils to give districts more flexibility. The House amended the bill to remove all of the details related to school funding. As amended, the bill only provides more flexibility in school district transportation requirements.
HB 716 (2019)
Requires the Department of Education to cover the costs of transporting a student to his or her original school when he or she is living in another district during an abuse or neglect proceeding.
HB 719 (2019)
Establishes the position of school nurse coordinator within the Department of Education.
HB 720 (2019)
Allows a retired faculty member of the community college system to begin part-time employment a college prior to 28 days after retirement without affecting his or her retirement allowance.
More Info | Sponsor: Mel Myler
HB 721 (2019)
Requires the school district where a student lives to provide, and fund, the education of a child with disabilities according to the child's individualized education program (IEP) when the child is attending a nonsectarian private school, due to there being no public school for the child's grade level in the resident district.
More Info | Sponsor: Tamara Le
HB 723 (2019)
Adds drug convictions, first degree assault, second degree assault, domestic violence, and arson to the criminal background checks for school employees and volunteers. The bill also requires the Department of Education to oversee criminal background checks for teacher certification.
HB 730 (2019)
Reestablishes the CART (Computer Aided, Realtime Translation of spoken English) provider and sign language interpreter net tuition repayment fund.
HB 733 (2019)
Requires schools to equip classrooms with emergency medical kits. The bill sets aside $200,000 for the state to provide these kits.
HB 734 (2019)
Suspends the 4% annual decrease in stabilization grants for two years. Those grants limit funding decreases in a school district.
SB 108 (2019)
Removes private colleges and universities from eligibility under the governor's scholarship program, and clarifies the scholarships are only available to first-year students.
SB 12 (2019)
Establishes the New Hampshire college graduate retention incentive partnership (NH GRIP) which provides $1,000 annually for four years to an in-state college graduate who is hired by a participating in-state employer.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 136 (2019)
Allows the University System Board of Trustees to establish "criteria" rather than "rules" for classifying students for in-state and out-of-state tuition. This would exempt the criteria from the rule-making process that includes legislative oversight.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 137 (2019)
Phases in the recently adopted education and certification requirements for school nurses.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 138 (2019)
Authorizes Signum University to grant degrees in this state.
More Info | Sponsor: David Starr
SB 139 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study options for lowering student loan debt.
SB 140 (2019)
Permits the state Board of Education to adopt rules relative to alternative programs for granting credit that have been approved by school districts.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 141 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study violence against school personnel.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 142 (2019)
Requires school boards to make feminine hygiene products available, free of charge, in girls restrooms located in public high schools.
SB 143 (2019)
Limits the amount the Department of Education can set aside for administering state aid for special education.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 144 (2019)
Requires the Lottery Commission to notify the Department of Education about revenue received from Keno each fiscal year.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 196 (2019)
Repeals the requirement that schools get parental permission for students to participate in non-academic surveys, and instead requires schools to offer an opt-out option for parents.
SB 198 (2019)
Permits school board members to review applications and attend interviews of candidates for administrative positions in the school district.
More Info | Sponsor: Ruth Ward
SB 199 (2019)
Requires annual training in suicide awareness and prevention for teachers and administrators.
More Info | Sponsor: Ruth Ward
SB 253 (2019)
Requires the Department of Safety to establish a statewide, real-time threat notification system for the purpose of allowing school personnel to notify law enforcement officials directly in the event of a direct threat against a school community.
SB 263 (2019)
States, "No person shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination in public schools because of their age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, color, marital status, familial status, physical or mental disability, religion or national origin," and allows individuals to file lawsuits under this law.
SB 265 (2019)
Freezes stabilization grants for school districts that would otherwise receive less per-pupil school funding from the state. Starting in fiscal year 2020, municipalities would receive the 2012 stabilization grant every year.
SB 266 (2019)
Ends the system of funding full-day kindergarten programs through keno, and instead includes full-day kindergarten students in the calculation of per-pupil state education funding for all students in grades K-12. Keno revenue would instead go to school building aid.
SB 267 (2019)
Requires the Department of Education, for purposes of the statewide assessment program, to provide the testing organization with individual pupil names and unique pupil identifiers. That organization would be responsible for tracking and reporting individual student growth.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 268 (2019)
Offers in-state tuition at any institution in the University System of New Hampshire for any person who is registered to vote in this state.
SB 276 (2019)
Expands career and technical education (CTE) by permitting students in grade 10 to enroll in CTE courses designated by the Community Colleges System of New Hampshire, expanding CTE reporting requirements, and sending $500,000 to the Department of Education to support CTE.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 277 (2019)
Increases the additional per-pupil state funding for charter schools, from $3,411 to $3,911.
More Info | Sponsor: Ruth Ward
SB 278 (2019)
Sends $1 million to a new Education Administration Efficiency Fund, from which the Department of Education shall provide grants to school districts to lower administrative costs.
SB 280 (2019)
Changes the calculation of the statewide education property tax, from whatever level necessary to reach $363 million, to whatever level equal to $7,500 per student. The bill also changes how students are counted in each district, for example to include homeschool students. Lastly, this bill allows school boards to contract with religious schools - not just nonsectarian private schools - to provide education.
More Info | Sponsor: John Reagan
SB 281 (2019)
Authorizes the Department of Health and Human Services to contract with the Center for Life Management to provide school crisis response and prevention services in Rockingham County, and sets aside $800,000 for this purpose.
SB 282 (2019)
Requires schools to develop a policy for preventing and responding to student suicide, and requires school to train faculty, staff, and volunteers on suicide prevention.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 302 (2019)
Modifies the law regulating school suspensions and expulsions. For example, this bill decreases the maximum length of suspensions, and requires a school district to conduct a functional behavior assessment and implement a positive behavior intervention plan for any student suspended more than 5 days in any school year.
SB 303 (2019)
Ends the proration of special education grants, so that schools will get 100% of the entitlement amount starting in fiscal year 2021. At the time of this bill's submission, schools only get a percentage of the special education grant they are entitled to, based on funds available.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 309 (2019)
Revises stabilization grants, so that every year towns will get a grant equal to the difference between fiscal year 2019 and fiscal year 2020 school funding from the state. The Senate amended the bill so that starting in 2020, stabilization grants will return to their original, 2012 levels.
SB 318 (2019)
Expands the business tax credit scholarship program to allow donations to public schools and workforce development programs, such as programs in career and technical education. This bill establishes an education tax credit management commission to oversee the public school grants.
SB 65 (2019)
Prohibits public schools from beginning the school year before Labor Day.

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT
This issue category starts with eminent domain and ends with wind farms. Click here to see issues related to your next electricity bill.

HB 667 (2019)
Requires that well water meets water quality standards before a builder can get a certificate of occupancy.
HB 668 (2019)
Revises the law restricting heating, agitating, or other devices in state waters to prohibit the placement of devices that prevent ice forming on someone else's property, not just in public access areas.
HB 679 (2019)
Directs the Department of Environmental Services to establish a leasing program for land associated with state-owned impoundments.
HB 682 (2019)
Combines the Wetlands and Shorelands Fund with the Terrain Alteration Fee Account to create the Water Resources Fund. The bill raises various wetlands, terrain alteration, and shoreland fees to maintain financial sustainability for the programs.
More Info | Sponsor: Judith Spang
HB 704 (2019)
In the event that the federal government seeks to store high-level radioactive waste in New Hampshire, this bill creates several committees and commissions to oversee the process.
HB 707 (2019)
If the state wins a lawsuit under the hazardous waste cleanup law to recover costs to clean up water pollution, this bill requires the money won in the lawsuit to go into the drinking water and groundwater trust fund rather than the hazardous waste cleanup fund.
HB 715 (2019)
Establishes goals for energy storage capacity and requires the Public Utilities Commission to adopt rules to achieve these goals.
HB 735 (2019)
Establishes a fee on any carbon-based fuel imported, sold, or used in New Hampshire. The revenue would be split between greenhouse gas reduction programs, customer rebates, and administration costs.
HB 736 (2019)
Reestablishes the commission to study environmentally-triggered chronic illness.
HB 737 (2019)
Establishes a commission to investigate and analyze the environmental and public health impacts from perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in the air, soil, and groundwater in Merrimack, Bedford, and Litchfield.
HJR 1 (2019)
Urges the governor to request that the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management form a task force to plan for offshore wind development in the Gulf of Maine.
HJR 2 (2019)
Requests that the federal government exclude New Hampshire from offshore oil and gas drilling and exploration activities.
SB 121 (2019)
Allows the Department of Environmental Services acquisition rights and easements at Weeks Crossing Dam in the town of Warren.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 122 (2019)
Repeals ratepayer rebates under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), and instead sends those proceeds to various energy efficiency programs.
SB 123 (2019)
Requires the Public Utilities Commission to adopt rules for reporting lost and unaccounted for gas by natural gas companies. The bill also prohibits electric distribution companies from acquisition of natural gas capacity or supply or interests in natural gas infrastructure at ratepayers' expense.
SB 124 (2019)
Revises the required minimum percentages of renewable energy in the Renewable Portfolio Standard, particularly to extend goals from 2025 to 2040.
SB 13 (2019)
Adds storage systems to the net metering law. The bill makes several other changes to the laws regulating customer-generators and net metering.
SB 132 (2019)
Names the lake along route 104 in Meredith as Lake Wicwas.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 159 (2019)
Increases the electric generating capacity of customer generators who may participate in net energy metering, generally from 1 megawatt to 5 megawatts. The bill also requires distribution utilities to "take any and all steps necessary to eliminate or mitigate the creation of any ratepayer costs that could otherwise arise as a result of the utility's handling or accounting of kilowatt-hours generated by a customer-generator and fed into the electric distribution system."
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 163 (2019)
Requires the Department of Environmental Services to act upon a permit application no later than 180 days after the application is deemed complete, unless the applicant agrees to an extension.
SB 164 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study the long-term sustainability of the water supply land protection grant program. The Senate amended the bill to instead establish a committee to study unprotected drinking water sources and estimate the costs of protecting such sources.
SB 165 (2019)
Modifies the method for calculating net energy metering credits for low-moderate income community solar group host projects. This bill also requires at least three new low-moderate income community solar projects each year in each utility's service territory.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 166 (2019)
Requires competitive electricity suppliers to purchase electricity generation from net energy metering according the same rules and tariffs as regulated electric utilities.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 167 (2019)
Establishes a commission to investigate the cost-effective procurement of renewable energy generation resources.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 168 (2019)
Increases the percentage of electricity that must come from solar energy under the renewable portfolio standard.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 169 (2019)
If the state wins a lawsuit under the hazardous waste cleanup law to recover costs to clean up water pollution, this bill requires the money won in the lawsuit to go into the drinking water and groundwater trust fund rather than the hazardous waste cleanup fund.
More Info | Sponsor: Chuck Morse
SB 171 (2019)
Sends $1.6 million to the drinking water and groundwater trust fund to reimburse a grant to the Department of Education to remove lead from drinking water lines in schools.
More Info | Sponsor: Chuck Morse
SB 181 (2019)
Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to develop a network of stations to monitor radioactive airborne material.
SB 193 (2019)
Prohibits the sale of furniture and carpeting with more than 0.1% of a flame-retardant chemical.
SB 200 (2019)
Adds the protection of "wildlife corridors and habitat strongholds" to the mission of various and programs.
SB 202 (2019)
Establishes a Stormwater Management and Flood Resilience Fund within the Department of Environmental Services.
SB 203 (2019)
Modifies the legal requirements for wetlands and environmental council administrative appeals.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 204 (2019)
Modifies the regulation of distributed energy cresources of electric utilities, in particular to accommodate consumer energy storage systems. This bill also enables cities and towns to adopt a property tax exemption for electric energy storage systems.
SB 205 (2019)
Repeals the requirement for legislative approval to change the system benefits charge part of electricity bills. This bill also requires that at least 20% of the system benefits charge dedicated to energy efficiency programs goes to low income energy efficiency programs. Lastly, this bill adds a member of the New Hampshire Bankers Association to the Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Energy Board.
SB 206 (2019)
Excludes the costs of lobbying and political activity from the rates or charges of public utilities.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 207 (2019)
When referencing the report "Sea-Level Rise, Storm Surges, and Extreme Precipitation in Coastal New Hampshire: Analysis of Past and Projected Trends," this bill allows rules from the Department of Environmental Services to reference the report "as updated" without a specific date.
SB 21 (2019)
If an intent to cut timber is signed by assessing officials in a public meeting, this bill removes the public notice requirement.
More Info | Sponsor: David Starr
SB 24 (2019)
Amends New Hampshire's Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) law to match the new rules adopted by all the states in the RGGI organization in December 2017.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 254 (2019)
Sends approximately $7.2 million to the state aid grant program to fund eligible wastewater projects.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 257 (2019)
Prohibits the use of foams containing perfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs) in fighting fires.
SB 269 (2019)
Sends $100,000 to the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources for the development of a new tool called the upland ecological integrity assessment. According to the department, "the tool would be developed for public land managers to identify and dedicate exemplary natural communities; provide information on the ecological integrity of forests; inform resource management decision-making; and could serve as a model of land stewardship on public lands."
More Info | Sponsor: Ruth Ward
SB 275 (2019)
Requires the state government to transition to zero emission vehicles by 2039.
SB 284 (2019)
Requires the Public Utilities Commission to design and operate a statewide online energy data platform that can be used to analyze energy use.
SB 285 (2019)
Allows municipalities to unify and establish joint municipal development and revitalization districts in response to climate emergencies, such as sea-level rise, storm surge, and extreme precipitation. The bill similarly authorizes the Strafford regional planning commission, Rockingham planning commission, and participating municipalities to form an authority to plan for and address sea-level rise, storm surge, and flooding from extreme precipitation events. This bill specifically allows for the creation of Coastal Resilience and Cultural and Historic Reserve Districts by municipalities, regional planning commissions, and state agencies to acquire land and other resources in response to climate change. The bill also establishes a new Coastal Resilience and Historic Reserve District Fund to identify and protect historic properties at risk from flooding. Lastly, this bill directs the Department of Transportation to consider the impact of sea-level rise, storm surge, and extreme precipitation events on state highways as part of the Ten-Year Highway Plan.
SB 286 (2019)
Permits towns, cities, and counties to develop electric aggregation programs, where they buy electricity in bulk on behalf of residents, ideally negotiating lower prices.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 287 (2019)
Establishes maximum contaminant levels and ambient groundwater quality standards for five perflourinated compounds (PFCs): PFOA, PFOS, PFHxS, PFNA, and PFBS.
SB 307 (2019)
Requires a state agency funding permanent outdoor lighting to ensure that such lighting has a color correlated temperature of 3,000 degrees Kelvin or less when requested by a town or city. The bill would also allow the state to take ownership and take over operation and maintenance of its street lighting.
SB 72 (2019)
Under the Renewable Portfolio Standard, electricity producers must obtain a certain percentage of power from renewable sources. This bill repeals the law that requires the Public Utilities Commission to give credit to electricity producers for net metering customers when making that percentage calculation.
SB 73 (2019)
Requires the Public Utilities Commission to quantify a range of environmental costs and socioeconomic costs associated with each method of electricity generation, and consider those costs when evaluating and selecting resource options of electric utilities.
SB 75 (2019)
Establishes a commission to study the economic impact of a national carbon pricing program on New Hampshire.

HEALTH CARE
Do you support the Affordable Care Act in NH? What about the medical marijuana or physician-assisted suicide? This category covers all of those issues and more.

HB 607 (2019)
Moves the law requiring insurance coverage for medically necessary dental services from the chapter on "portability, availability, and renewability of health coverage" to the chapters on "accidental and health insurance" and "managed care law."
HB 610 (2019)
Directs health care providers to refer or prescribe treatment alternatives, such as physical therapy, before prescribing an opioid. The bill also creates a "nonopioid directive form" that patients could choose to sign to refuse all opioid prescriptions. This bill also requires health insurances to cover nonopioid treatment for pain, including but not limited to, chiropractic care, osteopathic manipulative treatment and acupuncture treatment.
HB 615 (2019)
Makes various changes to the regulation of pharmacies and pharmacists by the board of pharmacy.
HB 627 (2019)
Requires the Board of Pharmacy to adopt rules on exceptions from compliance with the United States Pharmacopeia for veterinarians.
HB 638 (2019)
Requires health care providers to require patients to sign a form upon dispensing opioids explaining the addictive nature of such drugs.
HB 644 (2019)
Establishes an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) state registry within the Department of Health and Human Services to conduct surveys of ALS, enable analysis of the data, and facilitate planning for services to persons with ALS and their families.
HB 652 (2019)
Requires the state Board of Education to adopt rules requiring teachers and administrators in the public schools to receive annual training in suicide awareness and prevention.
More Info | Sponsor: Gates Lucas
HB 656 (2019)
Establishes a commission to study the impact of financial initiatives for commercially insured members by drug manufacturers on prescription drug prices and health insurance premiums. For example, the commission would study how the use of free drug samples, drug copay coupons, and drug discount cards affect medical cost trends and health insurance premiums.
HB 657 (2019)
Requires health plans offering prescription drug benefits under the managed care law to include on the formulary the drug with the lowest cost option for the insured.
HB 658 (2019)
Limits increases under the managed care program to the maximum allowable cost or other allowable payment for drugs without approval from the Insurance Department.
HB 659 (2019)
Requires the Insurance Department to request data from health carriers regarding prescription drug benefits which are outsourced to a pharmacy benefit manager or similar entity as part of the preparation for the Insurance Department's annual hearing requirement.
HB 670 (2019)
Requires health insurance carriers to maintain data on amounts paid to pharmacies and other health care providers for all prescription drugs on behalf of their covered members, even if such coverage is managed by a pharmacy benefit manager.
HB 671 (2019)
Applies many state regulations of health insurance carriers to pharmacy benefit managers. This includes, for example, consumer complaint procedures.
HB 685 (2019)
Prohibits balance billing for ambulance services. The bill also limits reimbursement for ambulance services to a "commercially reasonable value."
HB 690 (2019)
Repeals the work and community engagement requirements for the Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid.
HB 691 (2019)
Requires the state to implement a program to provide blood testing for persons exposed to perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) through private or public water supplies at the reduced analytical laboratory price available to state contract holders.
More Info | Sponsor: Wendy Thomas
HB 692 (2019)
Requires the Medicaid managed care program to provide dental benefits.
HB 693 (2019)
Requires health care practitioners and facilities to provide services for patients funded by Medicaid and uninsured persons, or pay a $10,000 annual fee per practitioner or full-time staff. The revenue from those fees would go to aid to people without insurance or enrolled in Medicaid.
HB 695 (2019)
Requires nonprofit organizations advocating on behalf of patients or that fund medical research to publicly report payments received from a pharmaceutical business or health insurer.
HB 697 (2019)
Establishes a single payer health care system to provide health care for the citizens of New Hampshire.
HB 703 (2019)
Requires prescription drug manufacturers to provide written notice to the Department of Justice if they introduce a new prescription drug to the market at a wholesale acquisition cost that exceeds the threshold set for a specialty drug under the Medicare Part D program.
HB 717 (2019)
Generally prohibits prescription drug manufacturers from offering coupons or discounts to cover insurance copayments or deductibles if a drug has a generic equivalent.
HB 725 (2019)
Places Medicaid managed care organizations under the same regulations as other health insurers.
HB 726 (2019)
Requires the Department of Corrections and Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to work together to operate the secure psychiatric unit of the state prison as a hospital until a new secure psychiatric hospital is built. This bill also tasks DHHS with constructing a new secure multi-purpose forensic psychiatric hospital. The House amended the bill to instead establish a Secure Forensic Psychiatric Hospital Advisory Council to assist DHHS in planning and constructing a new secure multi-purpose forensic psychiatric hospital.
HB 739 (2019)
Requires parity between mental health services and medical expenses for purposes of the spend-down requirement for persons receiving public assistance, such as Medicaid. The spend-down requirement provides an opportunity for people above the income limits for eligibility to become eligible after "spending down" their income on medical expenses.
HCR 2 (2019)
Requests that the U.S. Congress, the Department of Defense, and the Veterans Administration investigate whether opioids, benzodiazepines, and exposure to Agent Orange contribute to a higher rate of suicides by veteran members of the armed forces.
More Info | Sponsor: Max Abramson
SB 1 (2019)
Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 11 (2019)
Sets aside a total of $9.5 million to increase in-patient beds and affordable, supported housing opportunities for people with mental illness. This bill also requires health insurers to provide coverage for emergency room boarding for mental health reasons that is comparable to coverage for patients admitted for medical surgical reasons. The Senate amended the bill by increasing the total funding to roughly $10.6 million, including funding for a new mobile crisis team or behavioral health crisis treatment center. The Senate amendment also lays out more nuanced requirements for health insurance coverage of emergency room boarding and treatment for mental health reasons.
SB 111 (2019)
Revises the laws regulating privacy of health data, as requested by the Department of Health and Human Services.
SB 115 (2019)
Establishes a commission to study the business environment for mental health providers.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 117 (2019)
Prohibits a physician, surgeon, or student from performing a pelvic examination on an anesthetized or unconscious female patient unless such examination is within the scope of care for the surgical procedure.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 119 (2019)
Requires hospitals run by educational institutions to implement an operational plan for the recognition and management of patients with dementia or delirium in acute-care settings.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 120 (2019)
Revises the regulation of the prescription drug monitoring program. For example, this bill de-identified data to be kept indefinitely for analytical purposes, and allows the program to share information with other state departments. The bill also transfers responsibility for the program from the Board of Pharmacy to the Office of Professional Licensure.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 142 (2019)
Requires school boards to make feminine hygiene products available, free of charge, in girls restrooms located in public high schools.
SB 145 (2019)
Allows medical marijuana alternative treatment centers to organize as business corporations and limited liability companies rather than only not-for-profits.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 150 (2019)
Allows individuals and businesses with under 100 employees to purchase health insurance from out-of-state. If the federal Affordable Care Act is repealed, this bill also requires any out-of-state insurance company to offer 2 plans, one of which matches all of New Hampshire's requirements for in-state insurance policies.
More Info | Sponsor: David Starr
SB 175 (2019)
Revises the definition of "qualifying medical condition" for medical marijuana to include "any condition for which treatment is determined to be necessary by a provider."
More Info | Sponsor: John Reagan
SB 176 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study mental health and human service business process alignment and information system interoperability.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 177 (2019)
Requires a physician or APRN who is authorized to order involuntary emergency admission to the state mental health services system to make a written determination that physical restraints are necessary to protect the safety of the person and/or the public before restraints are used while a patient is being transported.
SB 178 (2019)
Regulates lense prescriptions made by telemedicine, for example prohibiting a prescription determined solely by use of an online questionnaire.
SB 179 (2019)
Modifies the authority for pharmacists and pharmacy interns to administer vaccinations by including vaccines listed in the recommended adult immunization schedule by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, rather than listing out specific vaccines by name.
SB 180 (2019)
Allows disclosure of communications between a mental health care provider and his or her client so long as the disclosure is constitent with the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 184 (2019)
Grants health care providers immunity for prescribing any federally-approved drug or device given in good faith to a patient, barring gross negligence and willful misconduct.
More Info | Sponsor: David Starr
SB 222 (2019)
Requires the Insurance Department to license and regulate pharmacy benefits managers.
SB 224 (2019)
Requires health insurers to cover treatment for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders.
SB 225 (2019)
Allows licensed physician assistants to provide various mental health-related services similar to those currently provided by physicians and advanced practice registered nurses.
SB 226 (2019)
Requires the Insurance Department to license and regulate pharmacy benefits managers. This bill also reestablishes a commission to study greater transparency in pharmaceutical costs and drug rebate programs.
More Info | Sponsor: Donna Soucy
SB 227 (2019)
Modifies the law governing multiple employer welfare arrangements, in which employers pool their contributions into a benefit plan for their employees.  According to the Insurance Department, this bill would establish parameters for association health plans that match changes in federal regulation, generally giving more insurance options to employers.  This is similar to 2019 bill SB 228, which is more restrictive.  For example, SB 227 allows more variation between association health plans and small group health insurance plans.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 228 (2019)
Modifies the law governing multiple employer welfare arrangements, in which employers pool their contributions into a benefit plan for their employees. According to the Insurance Department, this bill would establish parameters for association health plans that match changes in federal regulation, generally giving more insurance options to employers. This is similar to 2019 bill SB 227, but is more restrictive. For example, SB 227 allows more variation between association health plans and small group health insurance plans.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 232 (2019)
Creates an interstate compact for psychologists to practice telepsychology from other states with patients living in New Hampshire and practice "face to face" psychology on a temporary basis in New Hampshire.
More Info | Sponsor: John Reagan

POLITICS/POLITICAL PROCESS
Learn about campaigns and voting rights, from SB2 elections at the town level all the way up to the Electoral College in Presidential elections.

HB 403 (2019)
Includes credit unions in the definition of "bank" for the purposes of town trust funds.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 408 (2019)
Allows the town moderator or city clerk to postpone local elections by one week in the case of a weather or other emergency.
HB 415 (2019)
Modifies the method for towns to adopt SB2, so that the voting is by ballot, but on a separate ballot from the one used to elect officers.
More Info | Sponsor: Clyde Carson
HB 421 (2019)
Changes the procedures for summary judgment in a lawsuit, generally to penalize a party that does not provide affidavits.
HB 423 (2019)
Allows a member of the governing body of a municipality to be a nonvoting member of a town or district budget committee.
HB 429 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study ways to improve civic engagement in New Hampshire.
HB 431 (2019)
Eliminates the requirement that assistant moderators and clerks for additional polling places in towns be domiciled in the voting district.
HB 434 (2019)
Allows removal of a town clerk if there is evidence that the clerk knowingly violated a municipal personnel policy which, if committed by a municipal employee, would result in termination.
More Info | Sponsor: Mel Myler
HB 440 (2019)
Requires candidates to publicly disclose three years of tax returns to be eligible for federal office.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 441 (2019)
Requires a legislator to identify a private organization responsible for distributing a model act, if that act was then used by the legislator to draft proposed legislation. The bill also requires lobbyists to disclose their affiliation upon contacting a member of the Legislature.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 452 (2019)
Establishes a commission on the first-in-the-nation presidential primary to coordinate with and advise the secretary of state in regards to the primary. The secretary of state would retain the power of setting the date of the primary.
HB 453 (2019)
Adds the director of the Statehouse Visitors Center to the Statehouse Bicentennial Commission. The bill also makes all living former governors, speakers of the House of Representatives, Senate presidents, chief justices of the Supreme Court, and secretaries of state honorary chairs of the commission.
HB 456 (2019)
Repeals the exception to lobbyist registration for an employee communicating with government officials about his or her employer's personal views.
HB 457 (2019)
Requires the state House of Representatives to live-stream and record every committee meeting for the public. The House amended the bill to instead establish a committee to study the issue of committee recordings.
HB 469 (2019)
Prohibits amendments to petitioned warrant articles that "change the intended effect of the article as presented in the original petition."
HB 504 (2019)
Calls on the U.S. Congress to support constitutional amendments that give legislatures complete control over election-related spending (including limits on independent spending by individuals and PACs) and that prohibit the drawing of electoral districts to favor one party.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 505 (2019)
Allows voters to vote for multiple candidates for the same office.
More Info | Sponsor: Max Abramson
HB 506 (2019)
Makes the September primary day and November general election day state holidays.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 519 (2019)
Establishes various procedures to select state delegates to a national constitutional convention, if a convention is ever called.
HB 531 (2019)
Allows unrelated caregivers to deliver absentee ballots on behalf of voters who reside in nursing homes or assisted living facilities.
HB 535 (2019)
Permits persons 60 years of age or older to vote up to 5 weeks prior to the date of a general election under procedures developed by the secretary of state.
HB 539 (2019)
Requires the secretary of state to provide technical assistance to any city or town, at no cost to the town, for implementing the One4all Accessible Voting System in municipal elections. The One4all voting system is a ballot marking system that allows voters with disabilities to vote through a computer tablet that prints a marked ballot. ˙
More Info | Sponsor: Skip Berrien
HB 541 (2019)
"National Popular Vote Bill," an interstate agreement to elect the President by national popular vote.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 553 (2019)
Requires a quorum to be present at the deliberative session of a town's annual meeting in order to amend a petitioned warrant article. This applies to towns that have adopted SB2.
HB 554 (2019)
Authorizes a moderator to conduct a verification count of machine-counted ballots.
HB 556 (2019)
Permits municipalities to process, but not count, absentee ballots prior to election day.
HB 576 (2019)
Limits the authority of local officials to make transfers in a municipal budget.
HB 588 (2019)
Revises the declaration of candidacy form for presidential candidates so that a candidate does not have to be a formal member of the political party he or she is seeking to run in, and instead only needs to be "a recognized candidate for President in the party in which I desire to file." This could impact candidates such as Bernie Sanders, who is an independent in the U.S. Senate but ran for president as a Democrat.
HB 593 (2019)
Outlines procedures that supervisors of the checklist must follow when they receive informal reports that a voter has died or has changed address, involving sending a verification letter to the last known address.
HB 603 (2019)
Establishes a procedure to draw electoral districts using a computer algorithm.
HB 611 (2019)
Allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, whether or not he or she will actually be absent on election day.
HB 624 (2019)
Establishes a commission to study the efficiency and effectiveness of management systems and customer service provided by state agencies.
HB 643 (2019)
Changes the date of the state primary election to the second Tuesday in June.
HB 650 (2019)
Establishes a committee to study the economic challenges of employed persons serving in the New Hampshire Legislature.
More Info | Sponsor: Tom Loughman
HB 651 (2019)
Permits candidates to use campaign funds for child care expenses.
More Info | Sponsor: Tom Loughman
HB 666 (2019)
Allows the Ballot Law Commission to issue an advisory opinion about a winning candidate, at the request of a losing candidate. Generally speaking the Ballot Law Commission only has authority over whether or not candidates are qualified to appear on a ballot.
HB 706 (2019)
Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by the secretary of state after a public application process that includes input from legislative leaders.
HB 708 (2019)
Requires appeals to the Supreme Court to be accompanied by an electronic transcript of the lower court proceedings, if such transcript exists.
HB 718 (2019)
Allows a presidential candidate in a primary to request a moderator or clerk to create an "instant polling place" at a location where a candidate gathers at least 5,000 residents.
HB 728 (2019)
Establishes procedures for ranked choice voting for federal and state offices.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 729 (2019)
Creates the Office of the Right-to-Know Ombudsman as an alternative route to resolving right-to-know complaints. The bill also establishes a Citizens' Right-to-Know Appeals Commission to oversee the ombudsman process.
HCR 1 (2019)
Rescinds all requests by the New Hampshire Legislature for a federal constitutional convention.
HCR 5 (2019)
Requests that Congress propose a constitutional amendment reversing the effects of the U.S. Supreme Court rulings in Buckley v. Valeo and Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission.
More Info | Sponsor: Kat McGhee
HCR 6 (2019)
Requests that Congress propose a constitutional amendment imposing congressional term limits.
HCR 7 (2019)
Urges the president and congress to adopt a policy renouncing the first use of nuclear weapons.
HR 6 (2019)
Urges the United States to lead a global effort to prevent nuclear war.
HR 7 (2019)
Resolution stating the New Hampshire House of Representatives "condemns President Trump's attempt to use the recent government shutdown to further presidential policies at the expense of federal employees and the American public and urges Congress to enjoin any subsequent attempt by the President to claim a national emergency at the country's southern border."
SB 102 (2019)
Requires any presidential primary candidate to disclose 3 years' worth of his or her federal income tax returns.
SB 104 (2019)
Allows anyone concerned about traveling in a storm on election day to vote absentee. This bill also gives the moderator the power to postpone a local election due to a storm.
More Info | Sponsor: James Gray
SB 105 (2019)
Limits contributions to inaugural committees to $10,000 and requires the inaugural treasurer to have back-up receipts for individual expenditures over $1,000.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes

SOCIAL ISSUES
Abortion restrictions, immigration enforcement, and welfare restrictions fall in this category, which covers issues related to social services and morality.

HB 631 (2019)
Establishes a deaf children's bill of rights and an advisory council on the education of deaf children.
HB 633 (2019)
If a termination of a parental rights case starts as an abuse and neglect proceeding, this bill removes the requirement to legally "serve" the parent for the termination proceedings.
HB 655 (2019)
Permits a town to make bylaws regulating disorderly houses.
HB 669 (2019)
Requires drivers' licenses and nondrivers' identification cards to indicate gender as male, female, or other, as indicated by the applicant.
More Info | Sponsor: Gerri Cannon
HB 688 (2019)
Makes various changes to the regulations governing animal transfers and pet vendors. For example, this bill establishes a statewide animal transfer database to track animal transfers, licensed and registered pet vendors, shelters, and hobby breeders, animal health certificates and records, and municipal licenses of pets.
HB 696 (2019)
Establishes a process enabling vulnerable adults, such as an elderly person unable to manage home affairs in his or her best interest, to seek protective orders due to abuse, exploitation, and neglect.
HB 702 (2019)
Establishes a process for the Department of Health and Human Services to license supervised visitation centers.
HB 712 (2019)
Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.
HCR 3 (2019)
Designates March as diversity month and an opportunity to celebrate cultural diversity in New Hampshire.
HCR 4 (2019)
Urges media outlets not to broadcast the name or image of a suspected perpetrator of a mass shooting.
SB 1 (2019)
Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 107 (2019)
Allows the Department of Health and Human Services to offer foster care for youths under age 21, if the youth is employed or going to school, as part of voluntary services offered by the department.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 116 (2019)
Reinstates the state-funded Assistance Program for Two-Parent Families with Dependent Children and extends the program to grandparents caring for minor children.
SB 125 (2019)
Provides that parental reimbursement shall not be required for voluntary services provided under the CHINS (Children In Need of Services) program.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 131 (2019)
Reestablishes the commission to study grandfamilies in New Hampshire.
SB 14 (2019)
Directs the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to expand home and community-based behavioral health services for children, for example to include mobile crisis response and stabilization services for children. This bill also directs DHHS to establish an organization to coordinate the care for children with complex behavioral health needs who are at risk for residential, hospital, or corrections placement or involved in multiple service systems. This bill also requires provider contracts to include the use of evidence-based practices.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 161 (2019)
Repeals the definition of "commercial kennel," and redefines "pet vendor" to specify a minimum transfer of twenty animals in a one-year period (which would cover the previous definition of "commercial kennel"). The Senate amended the bill to also authorizes the Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food to make rules relative to the number of amphibians, reptiles, fish, or small mammals a person may sell and qualify as a pet vendor. The Senate amendment also establishes a position of accounting clerk to oversee pet vendors. Lastly, the Senate amendment requires dogs, cats, and ferrets offered for transfer to be accompanied by a health certificate.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 174 (2019)
Proclaims an annual observance of Juneteenth on June 19.
SB 208 (2019)
Renames the Adjutant General's Department to the Department of Military Affairs and Veterans. This bill establishes divisions in the department, including the Office of Veterans and Veterans Council Services.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 209 (2019)
Establishes a commission to create a New Hampshire recovery memorial.
SB 23 (2019)
Prohibits towns from establishing a minimum age to purchase a product that is higher than the minimum age in state law.
SB 235 (2019)
Establishes an independent human resources professional in the administrative office for the Legislature, responsible for handling complaints involving sexual harassment.  This bill also requires legislators to receive training on sexual harassment. The Senate amended the bill to instead allow the Legislative Facilities Committee to propose rules for required training on harassment and discrimination.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Feltes
SB 261 (2019)
Provides that child care offered as a preventive and protective service through the Department of Health and Human Services shall be available to grandparents who are the legal guardians or primary caretakers of their grandchild. The bill also requires preventive and protective child care providers to be trained in trauma-informed care.
SB 263 (2019)
States, "No person shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination in public schools because of their age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, color, marital status, familial status, physical or mental disability, religion or national origin," and allows individuals to file lawsuits under this law.
SB 27 (2019)
Changes the names of some positions in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). ˙This bill also repeals the nomination process for division directors in DHHS.
More Info | Sponsor: John Reagan
SB 294 (2019)
Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to distribute $300,000 a year to cities, towns, and counties to develop and maintain court-approved diversion programs for juveniles.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 295 (2019)
Expands the authority of the Office of the Child Advocate to include oversight of any department, commission, board, institution, bureau, or office of the state, as well as other public and private organizations providing services to children through a state contract. The bill also establishes a child fatality review committee and an oversight commission on children's services.
SB 30 (2019)
Removes some criteria for members of the advisory board on services for children, youth, and families, for example to allow multiple members from the same county. This bill also sets four members as a quorum for the board.
More Info | Sponsor: John Reagan
SB 315 (2019)
Increases the liability of the state government in lawsuits over children in its custody or in need of its services.
SB 317 (2019)
Prohibits state and local governments from adopting policies that prohibit, restrict, or discourage the enforcement of federal immigration law. Any government that adopted a "sanctuary" policy would be ineligible for state or federal funds. A town, city, or county could be fined $1,000 to $15,000 for violating this law. The bill also allows the courts to remove someone from office for violating this law.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 42 (2019)
Designates Old Hampshire Applejack the state spirit of New Hampshire.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 6 (2019)
Appropriates roughly $8.6 million over two years to hire more child protective service workers and supervisors.
More Info | Sponsor: Jon Morgan
SB 77 (2019)
Requires a court to ban a person convicted of felony animal cruelty from owning any animals for at least five years. This bill also requires the courts to hold a preliminary hearing within 14 days if animals are confiscated as part of an animal cruelty case, and gives a defendant just 14 days to post a bond to cover the cost of care for the animals when appealing a conviction.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 84 (2019)
Sends roughly $5 million to the Department of Health and Human Services to expand homeless services.

TRANSPORTATION/RECREATION
NH doesn't require seat belts or motorcycle helmets, but there are boat speed limits on Lake Winnipesaukee. Click here to learn about laws affecting travel, infrastructure, and recreation.

HB 507 (2019)
Repeals license, registration, and inspection requirements for non-commercial drivers. This bill also requires the Department of Safety to issue non-commercial automobile owners a vehicle decal stating the vehicle is exempt from registration and a photo identification card, both at no cost.
HB 510 (2019)
Increases motor vehicle registration fees, and adds automatic increases to those fees going forward based on the Consumer Price Index and national average miles per gallon rating for all models.
HB 512 (2019)
Allows dogs off-leash on hiking trails in state parks and state forests, provided the dog is under the verbal or physical control of their owner or handler.
HB 515 (2019)
Establishes a commission to evaluate whether the collection of tolls on the turnpike system is cost effective.
More Info | Sponsor: Max Abramson
HB 516 (2019)
Requires the purchase of a $5 trout/salmon stamp to take trout or salmon, in addition to any fishing license. The revenue from the trout/salmon stamp would fund the installation of pollution control equipment at the Powder Mill fish hatchery in New Durham.
HB 517 (2019)
Repeals municipal vehicle registration permits.
HB 526 (2019)
Eliminates the Bureau of Certificate of Title within the Division of Motor Vehicles. However, the DMV says the bill does not eliminate the responsibility of the division to issue vehicle titles, so responsibilies would need to be reorganized.
HB 538 (2019)
Increases the gas tax from $0.222 per gallon to $0.282, for the purpose of funding state road and bridge projects.
HB 548 (2019)
Allows 501(c)(8) organizations to issue decals for multi-use decal license plates.
HB 549 (2019)
Establishes a gold star family license plate for family members of persons killed while on duty in the U.S. armed forces.
HB 563 (2019)
Increases the fine for failing to register a motor vehicle from $100 per occurrence to $100 per day.
HB 571 (2019)
Keeps the identity of a person secret if they report a driver may not be fit to drive, unless the report is malicious.
HB 579 (2019)
Allows towns and cities to offer a discounted automobile registration for seniors, veterans, and people with disabilities.
HB 580 (2019)
Permits the issuance of up to $5 million of state bonds for expansion of state campgrounds.
HB 591 (2019)
Makes various changes to the laws governing OHRVs and snowmobiles. For example, this bill requires operators to extinguish aftermarket lighting when driving on any public way, revises vehicle noise limits for OHRVs and snowmobiles, and requires safety belts for utility terrain vehicle operators and passengers under age 18.
HB 592 (2019)
Requires any person operating an OHRV along a public highway to be licensed to drive. At the time of this bill's submission, unlicensed drivers of at least age 12 may operate along a public highway so long as they have completed some training and are accompanied by a licensed driver.
HB 594 (2019)
Requires the Department of Transportation change from installing conventional rumble strips to sinusoidal type rumble strips (sometimes referred to as "mumble strips") on state roads and highways with adjacent residential development.
HB 612 (2019)
Repeals and reenacts the law governing certificate of origin for vehicles. According to the Department of Safety, this would result in a split system for vehicles delivered to the state by a manufacturer (which would not need a title) and vehicles titled in New Hampshire.
HB 613 (2019)
Requires proof of car insurance to register a vehicle.
HB 625 (2019)
Requires powerboats registered in another state to purchase and display a $20 aquatic invasive species decal.
HB 626 (2019)
Increases the penalty for illegally overtaking or passing a school bus, from a fine of $250 to a fine of $1,000. This bill also allows a license suspension of 30 days on the first offense.
HB 630 (2019)
Increases the fines for various off-highway recreational vehicle (OHRV) and snowmobile violations.
HB 639 (2019)
Lowers the minimum speed limit in the compact part of a city or town, from 25 mph to 20 mph.
HB 640 (2019)
Establishes a $10 annual registration fee for canoes and kayaks launched from public boat launches.
HB 645 (2019)
Converts the existing seasonal dock notification process to a voluntary registration process with a $200 fee. This bill also expands that process to include docks on rivers.
HB 660 (2019)
Requires the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources to study the effects of OHRV operation and limitations on designated public ways and roads.
HB 672 (2019)
Revises when it is legal to cross unbroken painted center lines, in particular to avoid people on the side of the road.
HB 674 (2019)
Limits the circumstances under which a vehicle can be impounded, generally requiring an effort to find the owner of a vehicle before impounding.
HB 683 (2019)
Makes several changes to the laws governing off-highway recreational vehicles (OHRVs). ˙In particular, this bill requires more notice to property owners abutting any highway or sidewalk when local authorities authorize OHRV use and requires two-thirds of abutters to approve OHRV use. ˙This bill also increases liability protection for those abutters if there is an injury or damage from OHRV use. ˙This bill also limits some other OHRV travel and lowers the noise limits for OHRVs.
HB 699 (2019)
Modifies the fee structure for OHRV and snowmobile registrations. For example, this bill removes the discounts for members of a nonprofit OHRV or snowmobile club, but applies those savings to all OHRV and snowmobile registrations.
HB 701 (2019)
Allows honorably discharged veterans who are 80-100% disabled to receive a 50% discount on the cost of a lifetime fishing, hunting, or bow and arrow license.
HB 727 (2019)
Sets aside $500,000 for additional parking and improving the boat ramp at Mount Sunapee state park beach. The bill also allows the state to lease the Wild Goose site, located on Birch Grove Road in Newbury, to a local municipal entity.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Wolf
SB 160 (2019)
Allows swimming at public boat access areas which are restricted to launching non-motorized or cartop watercraft such as a canoes.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley
SB 162 (2019)
Exempts commercial vessels from boat rafting rules.
SB 185 (2019)
Establishes a Rail Trail Corridors Advisory Committee to assist the Department of Transportation in updating the state trails plan.
More Info | Sponsor: Jay Kahn
SB 186 (2019)
Allows a veteran who qualifies for special number plates to be issued an additional set of plates for a fee.
SB 187 (2019)
Increases the registration fees for OHRV dealers and rental agencies, and for snowmobiles. This bill also modifies the definition of "antique snowmobile," which would only require a one-time registration fee.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 188 (2019)
Revises the ban on lights placed on shore that resemble in color or configuration the required navigation lights of any vessel, giving the Marine Patrol Bureau more discretion.
More Info | Sponsor: Bob Giuda
SB 201 (2019)
Requires the Department of Transportation and the Fish and Game Department to develop a plan for the construction of a ramp, dock, and parking at Great Bay Waters at Hilton Park in Dover.
SB 211 (2019)
Exempts the Department of Transportation from certain real estate reporting requirements when such reporting would be duplicative.
SB 213 (2019)
Provides legal immunity for campground owners, with some exceptions, for example if the owner injures a person through the operation of a motor vehicle.
More Info | Sponsor: Ruth Ward
SB 214 (2019)
Requires the Department of Transportation to study a sound barrier program. This bill also permits the department to acquire private or public property to mitigate "historical" - not just environmental - effects of transportation projects.
SB 215 (2019)
Removes the requirement that a licensed driver occupy the seat adjacent to a person learning to drive a bus and allows the licensed driver to sit adjacent to or beside the person learning to drive. This bill also changes the minimum number of passengers a commercial vehicle is designed to transport for purposes of penalties for driving while subject to an out-of-service order, from 15 to 16 or more including the driver
SB 216 (2019)
Establishes an automated vehicle testing and development commission and an automated vehicle testing pilot program. The Senate amended the bill to instead require the New Hampshire Transportation Council to oversee an automated vehicle testing pilot program.
SB 217 (2019)
Authorizes the designation of portions of state roadways as the Lafayette Trail.
More Info | Sponsor: Ruth Ward
SB 218 (2019)
Defines small unmanned aircraft and authorizes the Department of Transportation to regulate small unmanned aircraft systems.
SB 219 (2019)
Clarifies that the Department of Transportation is authorized to exchange property with owners as part of right-of-way negotiations and that such exchanges are exempt from the process for disposal of highway or turnpike funded real estate.
SB 220 (2019)
Enables the Department of Transportation to access crash data maintained by the department of safety, local law enforcement, and other government agencies.
SB 221 (2019)
Establishes a commission to study revenue alternatives to the gas tax for electric-powered and hybrid vehicles.
More Info | Sponsor: David Starr
SB 234 (2019)
Establishes the Office of Outdoor Recreation Industry Development within the Department of Business and Economic Affairs.
More Info | Sponsor: Jeb Bradley

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