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Historical Details

Position on Issues

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"While I feel 20 weeks should be long enough, I would want to see the specifics of the wording for the exceptions before voting on such a bill."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?

"I support expanded commuter rail."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

"I support term limits for New Hampshire elected officials."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?

"I support increased funding for heroin treatment programs."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH add an income tax on earned income?

"I am undecided if an income or sales tax would be most fair. I believe a study should be done to determine how best to fund the responsibilities of our government."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?

"I believe we need to find a broad base revenue solution for all to share more fairly in the cost of society than the property tax system. That burdens lower income people more severely than those with high income."

Voting Record, 2019

Voted in favor of HB 686, a bill that would extend the interest and dividends tax to capital gains and increase the exemptions and filing thresholds for the interest and dividends tax. HB 686 would have used the new capital gains tax revenue to increase per-pupil school funding and lower the state property tax rate.

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH authorize one or more casinos?

"I oppose casino gambling in New Hampshire."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH continue to base statewide assessments on Common Core standards?

"I support basing statewide assessments on Common Core standards."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH broaden campaign finance disclosure laws?

"I support broader campaign finance disclosure laws."

Voting Record, 2020

Voted for SB 124, a bill to revise the required minimum percentages of renewable energy in the Renewable Portfolio Standard, particularly to extend goals from 2025 to 2040.

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?

"Yes for traffickers, but discretion for treatment when addicted feeding habit"

Voting Record, 2020

Voted for HB 611 and HB 1672, both bills that would allow any voter to vote by absentee ballot, whether or not he or she will actually be absent on election day.

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?

"I support legalization for small amounts with regulation to guide public safety enforcement"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?

"I support expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead ofprivate insurance."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Was NH right to expand Medicaid eligibility, using private insurance wherever possible?

"I support NH's expanded Medicaid program."

Candidate's Website, 2017

"I will work to increase the minimum wage to ensure that those who work full time can earn a livable wage."

Candidate's Website, 2017

"I believe that ensuring that women's health counseling and birth control are accessible to all women is by far the most effective way to minimize abortion. While I believe in a women's right to control her body and reproductive decisions, I will also fight equally as fiercely to make it possible for a women to choose to have the child if she wishes by advocating for the availability of supportive services including affordable child care, child and family nutrition, affordable health care and educational support."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?

"I oppose increased state enforcement of federal immigration laws."

Voting Record, 2020

Voted for HB 1218, SB 159, and HB 365, all bills to increase the electric generating capacity of customer generators who may participate in net energy metering, generally from 1 megawatt to 5 megawatts.

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment?

"I believe our larger businesses are doing well. I believe we should be enhancing opportunities for our small business sector that provides a majority of our jobs."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH allow the Northern Pass to proceed with some (not all) of the lines buried?

"It has been disallowed. I did not support Northern Pass, but I do support the reduction of fossil fuels and bringing in cleaner energy sources."

Voting Record, 2019

Voted for HB 686, a bill that would increased per-pupil school funding by extending the interest and dividends tax to capital gains. HB 686 would also have increased the exemptions and filing thresholds for the interest and dividends tax, and lowered the state property tax rate.

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Is police brutality an issue in NH?

"I don't believe it is a serious issue in NH at this time."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?

"I support New Hampshire's participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire maintain the renewable portfolio standard, which requires public utilities in New Hampshire to obtain a certain percentage of electricity from renewable energy sources (25% by 2025)?

"I support the renewable portfolio standard in New Hampshire."

Candidate's Website, 2017

"I will support workers' rights to organize for fair wages, safe working conditions, and reasonable benefits. I believe those who benefit from these negotiations should contribute a fair share of the negotiating cost."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire government do more to increase the supply of affordable housing?

"New Hampshire government should do more to increase the supply of affordable housing."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?

"I support the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?

"I support New Hampshire continuing to administer statewide standards-based student assessments."

Voting Record, 2020

Voted for HB 712 and SB 1, both bills that would establish a statewide family and medical leave program, paid for with a percentage of employee wages, with no opt-out.

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?

"I support stricter gun control laws."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?

"I would only support funding for private or home school funding after the state truly provides adequate funding for the education for all children in our public schools to meet our constitutional responsibility."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should parents be allowed to opt their children out of the NH immunization/vaccination registry?

"Parents should not be allowed to opt their children out of the NH immunization/vaccination registry."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?

"New Hampshire should not impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH restrict further wind power development?

"I support wind power development - but with care in how it is sited."

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse from the 2018 election through the end of the legislative session in 2020. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. "Prime sponsored bills that became law" include bill texts that were incorporated into "omnibus" bills following the coronavirus emergency.

Session days attended
94% Present
Average 91%
Party unity score/partisanship
99% With Party
Average 95%
Participated in official roll call votes
96% Roll Call Votes
Average 86%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
3 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 3
Prime sponsored bills that became law
1 Became Law
Average 1

Voting Record

HB 1672 (2020)

Allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, whether or not he or she will actually be absent on election day. The Senate amended the bill to become the "Coronavirus Election Protection Act of 2020." The amended bill allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, allows town officials to start processing ballots before Election Day, and authorizes online voter registration.

HB 1577 (2020)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. Parental permission is required if a minor seeks a birth certificate change. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate.

HB 1280 (2020)

Caps how much health insurers can charge consumers for insulin at $100 for a 30-day supply. The Senate amended the bill to instead cap the payment at $30 for a 30-day supply.

HB 1166 (2020)

Establishes a committee to study the demographics of the uninsured population in New Hampshire, the barriers to obtaining healthcare coverage, and possible solutions to extend health insurance coverage. The Senate completely amended the bill to add various requirements and protections for employers and employees related to the coronavirus. For example, the amended bill allows employees to collect unemployment if they cannot go to work because they or a family member is sick with COVID-19 - even if Gov. Sununu ends the state of emergency.

HB 1247 (2020)

Requires landlords to provide at least 90 days notice before a rent increase over 5%. The House amended the bill to require 60 days notice for an increase over 5% and 90 days notice for an increase over 8%. The Senate amended the bill to instead remove the requirement of an eviction notice before public welfare departments provide rental assistance. The amended bill also "creates a duty of good faith and fair dealing for mortgage lenders." Lastly, the amended bill requires landlords to offer tenants a 6-month repayment plan for rent missed during the coronavirus emergency.

HB 1664 (2020)

Requires the Department of Environmental Services to establish a climate action plan, an office of the environmental advocate, and an oversight commission on environmental services. The House amended the bill to instead establish greenhouse gas emission reduction goals for the state. Those goals are a 20% reduction in statewide emissions by 2025, 50% by 2035, and 80% by 2050 (all compared to 1990 emissions). The amended bill also gives the Department of Environmental Services the authority to develop and update regularly a climate action plan.

HB 1645 (2020)

Extends the waiting period to annul a misdemeanor domestic violence offense, from 3 to 10 years. The Senate amended the bill to incorporate several other pieces of legislation.

HB 1454 (2020)

Gives local school boards the power to determine whether to grant academic credit for alternative extended learning and work-based programs. At the time of this bill's submission, that power lies with the state board of education. The Senate amended the bill to still require the state board of education to vet and approve alternative extended learning and work-based programs, which local school boards "may" accept for credit (similar to a different bill, SB 514).

HB 1264 (2020)

Extends the Commission on the Seacoast Cancer Investigation from 2020 to 2022. The Senate amended the legislation to incorporate several bills related to PFAS. In particular, the amended bill establishes maximum contaminant levels for perflourinated compounds (PFCs), as originally written in SB 287.

HB 1648 (2020)

Permits adults to possess up to 3/4 of an ounce of cannabis, 5 grams of hashish, and other cannabis-infused products, and permits adults to grow up to 6 cannabis plants at home in a secure location that is not visible from other properties. This bill also allows adults to give marijuana products away and sell marijuana accessories.

HB 514 (2019)

Establishes a seven day waiting period for the delivery of a firearm. There are some exceptions for rifle or shotgun purchases by hunters, law enforcement officers, and members of the armed forces. The Senate amended the bill, shortening the waiting period to three days.

HB 706 (2019)

Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by the secretary of state after a public application process that includes input from legislative leaders. The Senate amended the bill, generally giving the Secretary of State less say in the process.

SB 1 (2019)

Establishes a paid family and medical leave insurance program, which would be run by the state department of employment security. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. The bill does not allow anyone to opt-out of the program.

HB 2 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill (part 2).

HB 1 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill.

HB 564 (2019)

Makes it a misdemeanor to carry a firearm in a safe school zone. ˙There are some exceptions, for example if a person gets permission from the school board. The House amended the bill so that parents do not need to remove or unload firearms in their cars when picking up students. The amendment also specifically bans firearms on "school property" rather than in "school zones." School property includes buildings, grounds, school buses, and vans.

SB 290 (2019)

Modifies the work and community engagement requirements for the Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. For example, this bill extends the work requirement exemption for parents so that parents of children under age 13 are eligible for the exemption. This bill also gives the Department of Health and Human Services the authority to waive the work requirement until July 2021 if there is an inability to communicate with program participants.

HB 109 (2019)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks. Also requires private sales or transfers to go through a licensed firearm dealer, if it’s not absolutely clear that both the owner and the recipient are allowed to own guns.

HB 365 (2019)

Increases the electric generating capacity of customer generators who may participate in net energy metering, generally from 1 megawatt to 5 megawatts.

HB 481 (2019)

Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. A Cannabis Control Commission, similar to the Liquor Commission, would be responsible for licensing and enforcement. The bill also allows limited home-growing of marijuana for personal use.

HB 446 (2019)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate. The Senate amended the bill, for example to require the permission of a parent or guardian if a minor seeks a birth certificate change.

SB 10 (2019)

Increases the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020, then to $11 in 2022, except starting that year, employers would have to pay at least $12 per hour if they do not offer at least 10 paid sick days to employees.  The House and Senate amended the bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020 and $12 per hour in 2022, regardless of sick time.

HB 455 (2019)

Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole.

HB 105 (2019)

Generally repeals the voter registration changes passed in SB 3. For example, this bill removes the stricter requirements for voters who register within 30 days of an election. This bill also removes much of the new language on voter registration forms about domicile. This bill also removes the authority of the secretary of state to conduct post-election voter registration investigations, leaving that to the attorney general.

HB 558 (2019)

Prohibits food service businesses from providing a single-use plastic straw to a customer unless specifically requested.

HB 687 (2019)

Establishes "extreme risk protection orders," based on evidence that there is "a significant risk of causing bodily injury to himself or herself or others," which would require the subject of the order to surrender any firearms to law enforcement.

HB 712 (2019)

Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.

HB 731 (2019)

Gradually raises the state minimum wage, starting at $12 per hour in 2020 and ending at $15 per hour in 2024. The bill also raises the tipped minimum wage, although in 2024 it would still be 45% of the regular minimum wage. The bill requires cost of living adjustments every year. This bill also allows cities and towns to set a higher minimum wage. Lastly, this bill establishes a "training wage," no lower than $8.50, for employees under age eighteen for the first three months of employment.

HB 685 (2019)

Prohibits balance billing for ambulance services. The bill also limits reimbursement for ambulance services to a "commercially reasonable value." The Senate amended the bill to instead require insurance plans which cover maternity benefits to provide coverage for emergency or elective abortion services (similar to SB 486).

SB 500 (2018)

Removes the prohibition of carrying a loaded rifle or shotgun in or on a stationary motor vehicle, OHRV, snowmobile, or aircraft. This bill also changes some legal references to firearms, and allows licensed bow hunters to carry firearms. Lastly, this bill removes the ability to deny or revoke a hunting license if a person "is not a suitable person to carry firearms." The Senate amended the bill to also allow carrying a loaded firearm on a moving vehicle if the person is protecting livestock or crops. The Senate amendment also allows hunting with an air rifle.

CACR 22 (2018)

Constitutional amendment establishing various rights for crime victims.

HB 1264 (2018)

Redefines "resident" and "inhabitant" to remove the phrase "for the indefinite future." This bill would potentially require all voters domiciled in New Hampshire to follow residency laws, such as the requirement to register any car in New Hampshire.

SB 313 (2018)

Continues New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program. This bill makes several significant changes to the program. First, it moves participants off private insurance and into managed care, similar to traditional Medicaid enrollees. Second, it adds a work requirement for participants. Third, it removes funding from voluntary contributions by health care providers, which the federal government said is illegal.

HB 1319 (2018)

Prohibits discrimination based on gender identity.

SB 593 (2018)

Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole.

HB 1680 (2018)

Prohibits abortion after viability, unless the mother's life is in danger, "in cases of Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome, or to remove a fetus with severe anomalies incompatible with life."

HB 144 (2017)

Changes the annual county budget procedures for Rockingham County to match those used in Hillsborough County. Since the House failed to pass the 2018-2019 budget bill HB 1, the Senate amended this bill into a new budget bill.

HB 592 (2017)

Repeals the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). The House amended the bill to instead end energy efficiency grants, and send all the proceeds from RGGI to commercial and residential ratepayer rebates.

HB 628 (2017)

Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. The House amended the bill to increase the employee contribution to 0.67%, to allow employees to opt out, and to limit benefits to six weeks of paid leave.

SB 191 (2017)

Increases state funding for full-day kindergarten programs, with adjustments based on the number of English language learners and free and reduced lunch students in each district. The House amended the bill to simply provide full funding for full-day kindergarten programs, and half funding for half-day kindergarten programs. The House also added keno legalization to the bill to create the revenue for kindergarten funding.

HB 587 (2017)

Prohibits conversion therapy for anyone under age eighteen. Conversion therapy attempts to change a person's sexual orientation.

HB 656 (2017)

Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. The bill outlines various regulations, from the ability of municipalities to control the location of marijuana establishments, to labels disclosing the THC in each serving of a marijuana product. The bill also legalizes hemp. The House amended the bill to instead legalize possession and homegrowing of marijuana without allowing sales.

SB 193 (2017)

Establishes the "education freedom savings account program." This allows a parent to contract with a scholarship organization so that state education funding is transferred to the student's scholarship account rather than to the municipality in which the student resides.  The House amended the bill to limit the scholarships to certain students, particularly low income students, students in underperforming schools, and special education students.  The amended version also requires any student receiving a scholarship to complete an annual assessment to ensure academic progress.

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