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Current office:

NH House Rockingham County District 09

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse from the 2018 election through July 2020. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. "Prime sponsored bills that became law" include bill texts that were incorporated into "omnibus" bills following the coronavirus emergency.

Session days attended
92% Present
Average 91%
Party unity score/partisanship
95% With Party
Average 94%
Participated in official roll call votes
94% Roll Call Votes
Average 86%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
0 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 3
Prime sponsored bills that became law
0 Became Law
Average 1

Voting Record

HB 1166 (2020)

Establishes a committee to study the demographics of the uninsured population in New Hampshire, the barriers to obtaining healthcare coverage, and possible solutions to extend health insurance coverage. The Senate completely amended the bill to add various requirements and protections for employers and employees related to the coronavirus. For example, the amended bill allows employees to collect unemployment if they cannot go to work because they or a family member is sick with COVID-19 - even if Gov. Sununu ends the state of emergency.

HB 1247 (2020)

Requires landlords to provide at least 90 days notice before a rent increase over 5%. The House amended the bill to require 60 days notice for an increase over 5% and 90 days notice for an increase over 8%. The Senate amended the bill to instead remove the requirement of an eviction notice before public welfare departments provide rental assistance. The amended bill also "creates a duty of good faith and fair dealing for mortgage lenders." Lastly, the amended bill requires landlords to offer tenants a 6-month repayment plan for rent missed during the coronavirus emergency.

HB 1264 (2020)

Extends the Commission on the Seacoast Cancer Investigation from 2020 to 2022. The Senate amended the legislation to incorporate several bills related to PFAS. In particular, the amended bill establishes maximum contaminant levels for perflourinated compounds (PFCs), as originally written in SB 287.

HB 1280 (2020)

Caps how much health insurers can charge consumers for insulin at $100 for a 30-day supply. The Senate amended the bill to instead cap the payment at $30 for a 30-day supply.

HB 1454 (2020)

Gives local school boards the power to determine whether to grant academic credit for alternative extended learning and work-based programs. At the time of this bill's submission, that power lies with the state board of education. The Senate amended the bill to still require the state board of education to vet and approve alternative extended learning and work-based programs, which local school boards "may" accept for credit (similar to a different bill, SB 514).

HB 1577 (2020)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. Parental permission is required if a minor seeks a birth certificate change. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate.

HB 1645 (2020)

Extends the waiting period to annul a misdemeanor domestic violence offense, from 3 to 10 years. The Senate amended the bill to incorporate several other pieces of legislation.

HB 1648 (2020)

Permits adults to possess up to 3/4 of an ounce of cannabis, 5 grams of hashish, and other cannabis-infused products, and permits adults to grow up to 6 cannabis plants at home in a secure location that is not visible from other properties. This bill also allows adults to give marijuana products away and sell marijuana accessories.

HB 1664 (2020)

Requires the Department of Environmental Services to establish a climate action plan, an office of the environmental advocate, and an oversight commission on environmental services. The House amended the bill to instead establish greenhouse gas emission reduction goals for the state. Those goals are a 20% reduction in statewide emissions by 2025, 50% by 2035, and 80% by 2050 (all compared to 1990 emissions). The amended bill also gives the Department of Environmental Services the authority to develop and update regularly a climate action plan.

HB 1672 (2020)

Allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, whether or not he or she will actually be absent on election day. The Senate amended the bill to become the "Coronavirus Election Protection Act of 2020." The amended bill allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, allows town officials to start processing ballots before Election Day, and authorizes online voter registration.

HB 685 (2019)

Prohibits balance billing for ambulance services. The bill also limits reimbursement for ambulance services to a "commercially reasonable value." The Senate amended the bill to instead require insurance plans which cover maternity benefits to provide coverage for emergency or elective abortion services (similar to SB 486).

HB 687 (2019)

Establishes "extreme risk protection orders," based on evidence that there is "a significant risk of causing bodily injury to himself or herself or others," which would require the subject of the order to surrender any firearms to law enforcement.

HB 712 (2019)

Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.

HB 731 (2019)

Gradually raises the state minimum wage, starting at $12 per hour in 2020 and ending at $15 per hour in 2024. The bill also raises the tipped minimum wage, although in 2024 it would still be 45% of the regular minimum wage. The bill requires cost of living adjustments every year. This bill also allows cities and towns to set a higher minimum wage. Lastly, this bill establishes a "training wage," no lower than $8.50, for employees under age eighteen for the first three months of employment.

Position on Issues

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire government do more to increase the supply of affordable housing?

"NH should remove regulatory barriers that hinder the building of affordable housing"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?

"I oppose expanded commuter rail."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?

"I favor funding only those treatment programs that have proven themselves successful."

2018

"NH should not hinder the federal government's enforcement of immigration laws."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?

"I am opposed to expanded Medicaid"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"Common sense says that a baby that could live outside the womb deserves societal protection."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Is police brutality an issue in NH?

"Police brutality is not an issue in New Hampshire."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire maintain the renewable portfolio standard, which requires public utilities in New Hampshire to obtain a certain percentage of electricity from renewable energy sources (25% by 2025)?

"The RPS burden should not be allowed to make business in NH less competitive."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?

"Any standards should be chosen by local officials, not the state"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

"I support term limits for New Hampshire elected officials."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?

"I favor measures that prevent non-residents from voting here."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?

"This program implements a carbon tax, which I oppose, and it does nothing to address climate change."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?

"Legalization needs to be nationwide to be effective."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH add an income tax on earned income?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?

"I also oppose a carbon tax."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?

"NH needs to create more competition in education by supporting charter schools and other alternative educational programs. That would allow us to get better results from the monies we do spend."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment?

"Subsidies need to be limited in size and duration; tax credits also need a sunset provision."

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