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Historical Details

Position on Issues

Candidate's Website, 2022

"Public education in New Hampshire is under attack. This Governor and legislature sent millions of tax dollars to private and religious schools, which will almost certainly cause property taxes to rise and school budgets to tighten."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Was NH right to raise the gas tax in 2014?

Possible revenue sources: "Gasoline Tax, Tobacco Tax".

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"I oppose a ban on abortion after 20 weeks gestation, even with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 24 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"Reproductive health decisions such as contraception, abortion and family planning should be left up to the patient. It is not the role of government to interfere in the personal medical decision-making between a patient and their provider."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?

"I support expanded commuter rail."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

"I oppose term limits for New Hampshire elected officials."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?

"I support increased funding for heroin treatment programs."

Voting Record, 2014

Voted against allowing physician assisted suicide (HB 1325)

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban abortions during the first trimester (e.g. after 6 weeks gestation)?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban abortions during the second trimester (e.g. after 15 weeks gestation)?

Other, 2016

"I am completely supportive of the current law which prohibits cell phone use while driving unless it is hands-free."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban discussions about sexual orientation and gender identity in grades K-3?

Candidate's Website, 2022

Sen. Sherman voted to consider SB 298, a bill that would repeal the law aimed at banning critical race theory in public schools and workplaces.

On his campaign website Sen. Sherman also says, "Public education in New Hampshire is under attack. This Governor and legislature sent millions of tax dollars to private and religious schools, which will almost certainly cause property taxes to rise and school budgets to tighten. This Governor also signed legislation that censors teachers and caters to those who want to ban books and change history."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH add an income tax on earned income?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire add a tax credit for businesses that contribute to student loan repayment for employees?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire lower business taxes?

"We have consistently lowered business taxes in an environment of increasing state need for revenue to address crises in mental health, substance use, child abuse and public education. Programs to address these real problems must be adequately funded. I believe that we will not be able to address these challenges effectively if we continue to cut available revenue."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add a tax on capital gains?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the tax on cigarettes?

"This represents both a source of additional revenue to combat smoking and cover the cost of illness related to tobacco use as well as a proven deterrent to underage use of these products."

Candidate's Website, 2022

"The climate crisis is here. We must take aggressive action at the local, state, and federal level to protect against rising sea levels on the coast and the damaging impacts to our winter tourism activities."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2016

Should NH continue to base statewide assessments on Common Core standards?

"Whether it is called Common Core or something else, we need to set standards for our children's education that would reflect a competitive preparedness for college or an occupation of their choice."

Voting Record, 2022

Sen. Sherman voted against SB 418, a bill that would establish "affidavit balloting" for voters who do not have a valid identification at the polls. Those voters would be given a prepaid envelope to return with documentation proving their eligibility to vote, and their "affidavit ballots" would be numbered and counted separately. Any voter who fails to provide documentation proving their eligibility to vote within ten days of the election would have their ballot pulled and their votes deducted from the official vote totals.

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?

"We should revise the present law on marijuana to make it less punitive."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire add a fee or mileage charge for electric vehicle owners to help pay for transportation and/or electric infrastructure?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add restrictions to the governor's powers during a state of emergency?

"We need to be certain that all three branches of our state government are working in concert to tackle challenges posed by a state of emergency, consistent with the state constitution."

Voting Record, 2015

Voted in favor of 2015 House Bill 572. When residential land is taken through eminent domain for a gas pipeline, HB 572 allows the resident to require the pipeline company to purchase all of the land, not just a part.

Candidate's Website, 2022

"New Hampshire is in the midst of a housing crisis. Rental vacancy rates are under 1%, housing supply is at an all-time low, and prices are at an all-time high. Businesses can’t find workers because workers can’t find a place to live, seniors looking to downsize can’t afford to stay in their communities, and young families can’t afford to put down roots in the community. We need to cut through the red tape and government bureaucracy that stops smart growth, support zoning that makes sense for the modern economy, and invest in infrastructure like regional water and sewer that allows our communities to build housing."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2016

Should NH broaden campaign finance disclosure laws?

"We need full disclosure of the individuals or entities financing political campaigns."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire extend the renewable portfolio standard past 2025, requiring public utilities to obtain more than 25% of electricity from renewable energy sources?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire guarantee the right to access abortion before 24 weeks?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Should NH provide more funding for charter schools?

"With appropriate qualifying criteria, I would support increasing state funding to charter schools."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2016

Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?

"I support increased law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase public access to reports of police misconduct?

"Transparency in any profession, including my own, enhances professionalism encouraging behavior consistent with the highest standards of that profession."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Do you support the option of mail-in ballots for all voters, not just absentees?

"Having served on the Select Committee for the 2020 election and as Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Election Law and Municipal Affairs, I have a clear understanding of the complexities of our election process, both its strengths and weaknesses. I have supported allowing voters to vote absentee for any reason using our current secure absentee voting system."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?

"Without the capacity for marketing."

Voting Record, 2022

Sen. Sherman voted to pass HB 629, a bill that would legalize possession of up to 3/4 oz of marijuana for adults over age 21 without legalizing sales. The bill would also allow adults to cultivate six marijuana plants at home and creates a $100 fine for publicly smoking marijuana.

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by licensing growers and private retail locations?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by establishing state-run cannabis stores?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?

"Having helped design the NHHPP, I have always opposed the use of commercial carriers over MCOs for this population of patients. As I suspected, it turned out to be more expensive and the commercial products did not have the capacity to fully comply with Medicaid requirements, making it necessary for NH to arrange required wrap around services. The MCOs are private carriers who specialize in providing this level of coverage and monitoring outcomes metrics that comply with Medicaid federal standards."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2016

Was NH right to expand Medicaid eligibility, using private insurance wherever possible?

"I support NH's expanded Medicaid program."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire raise the minimum wage?

"Currently, the minimum wage for a full time worker still leaves that worker with earnings that barely exceed the federal poverty level. We need to recognize that no one can live even as a single adult on this level of income, which leaves them dependent on taxpayer support for their basic needs such as food and housing. At the current minimum wage, this represents a taxpayer subsidy of businesses unwilling to pay their workers a living wage."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Do employees in NH need more legal protections in the workplace?

Our employment laws are generally adequate as they are."

"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?

"I oppose increased state enforcement of federal immigration laws."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Should NH add restrictions on welfare recipients?

Regarding drug tests for welfare recipients: "I oppose such legislation given the significant cost and civil liberty implications of such legislation."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the size of solar panel installations that may participate in net energy metering?

"Lagging well behind other states in the region, we have companies poised to invest in our renewable infrastructure. States that have embraced this technology have seen broad fiscal, business, environmental and health rewards. It is well beyond time that NH move forward with this exciting opportunity."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment?

"I am in favor of targeted incentives for business investment."

Voting Record, 2014

Voted to repeal the death penalty (HB 1170)

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2016

Should NH allow the Northern Pass to proceed with some (not all) of the lines buried?

"I would support Northern Pass if lines buried as they are going to be in Vermont."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the base amount of per-pupil funding it provides to local school districts?

"We have downshifted the cost of public education on to our municipalities while failing to ensure the adequacy of education for every NH child. This has driven up local property taxes and resulted in glaring inequities in our children's educational experiences across the state."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should the state permanently increase how much tax revenue it shares with towns and cities every year, beyond public school funding?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the gradual phase-out of the Interests and Dividends tax?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Is police brutality an issue in NH?

"State government should take action to reduce police brutality in New Hampshire, for example by requiring body cameras or limiting the ability of police to acquire military equipment."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Do you support Gov. Sununu's proposal to allow employers and employees to opt-in to a private, paid family and medical leave insurance plan, based on a pool of state employees, excluding coverage for personal illness?

"It is neither sustainable nor broad enough to capture all who need this insurance coverage."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Should NH continue to use property taxes instead of a new broad-based tax, such as an income tax?

Does not support an income and/or sales tax. Possible revenue sources: "Gasoline Tax, Tobacco Tax".

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the state’s current system of public school funding, with each district’s total funding primarily dependent on local property tax revenue?

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?

"As we fail to join other state in the region in fully embracing this opportunity, we have lost ground on our investment in energy infrastructure and efficiency, which will result in higher energy prices in the long term."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire maintain the renewable portfolio standard, which requires public utilities in New Hampshire to obtain a certain percentage of electricity from renewable energy sources (25% by 2025)?

"I support the renewable portfolio standard in New Hampshire."

Candidate's Website, 2022

"Dr. Sherman supports a full range of reproductive health care services. As Governor, Dr. Sherman will be a fierce advocate for repealing Chris Sununu’s cruel abortion ban, which broke with decades of bipartisan respect for a women’s rights to work with her doctor to make her own health care decisions."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Should NH require car insurance for some or all drivers?

"I support legislation requiring auto insurance for all registered vehicles."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Should NH require labels on some or all genetically modified foods?

"I support this legislation especially since it is not a warning but only a label. There is no other state in the nation where people hold so fiercely to their right to make informed choices as in NH. There is no evidence that labeling will increase the price of foods and it is already done for many products both on a required and voluntary basis."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

Should NH pass right-to-work legislation?

"This is not the correct solution to issues regarding union contracts. It is a broad brush that disables much of the union representation useful to union and non-union workers as well as employers. This is why it is not being sought by most employers but rather by certain political activists. There are better more thoughtful approaches to issues with union contracts and employer/employee relations."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire create a road usage fee?

"We need to recognize that while all vehicles use our roads, those not reliant on fossil fuels do not pay to sustain them. With falling gas tax revenue, successful maintenance of our roads and bridges will require investment by all that access those transportation corridors."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire government do more to increase the supply of affordable housing?

"New Hampshire government should do more to increase the supply of affordable housing."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2016

What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?

"I support the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2014

State role in economic growth

"Yes, the state should do more. Attracting more businesses and aligning training/higher education with business needs should be a higher priority."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?

"I support New Hampshire continuing to administer statewide standards-based student assessments."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire create a statewide family and medical leave program, paid for with a percentage of employee wages, with no opt-out?

"Whether it is to be there for the birth and early life experience of your child or to assist in the care and decision-making regarding an elderly parent, these critically important instances should not leave an employee having to chose between their job or supporting their loved one. This is an insurance policy similar to unemployment insurance paid by the employee for the benefit of the employee. Furthermore, its availability enhances our attractiveness to young workers and their families."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?

"While a supporter of the right to gun ownership for responsible citizens for recreation and self-defense, I agree with gun violence reduction measures that close loopholes on background checks and limit access to military style weapons. I also support measures that decrease access to firearms for those who pose an imminent risk to themselves or others."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire provide student loan debt repayment programs for workers in industries with labor shortages?

"This is a critical incentive for workers especially in areas like LNAs for nursing homes and healthcare providers in underserved regions of the state."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add tax incentives for affordable housing development?

"Available and affordable housing is one of our state's biggest challenges. It is a key factor in attracting young workers and their families to NH to support or small and large business communities. Innovative programs that enable construction of or conversion to affordable housing will be required to tackle this problem."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?

"My children have attended both public and private schools. I am a product of public schools including a state medical school. We need to place our highest priority on our public and charter schools that carry the responsibility for educating all of our children regardless of their socioeconomic status, need or disability. I would never ask my neighbor or a taxpayer to fund my child's private school tuition. Private schools and religious schools, similar to private colleges and universities, have programs for inclusion of students unable to afford their fees, but taxpayers should not be funding education that does not provide a transparent mechanism for where those taxpayer dollars are going."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?

"New Hampshire should not impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2016

Should NH restrict further wind power development?

"I oppose restrictions on further wind power development."

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse from the 2018 election through the end of the legislative session in 2020. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. "Prime sponsored bills that became law" include bill texts that were incorporated into "omnibus" bills following the coronavirus emergency.

Session days attended
100% Present
Average 99%
Party unity score/partisanship
98% With Party
Average 97%
Participated in official roll call votes
100% Roll Call Votes
Average 99%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
31 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 28
Prime sponsored bills that became law
15 Became Law
Average 11

Voting Record

SB 432 (2022)

Repeal the Education Freedom Account program. The program allows the parent of a school age child to receive funds from a scholarship organization to pay for education expenses.

HB 1431 (2022)

Establishes a parental bill of rights. Some of the parental rights in this bill include:

HB 1022 (2022)

Authorizes pharmacists to dispense Ivermectin pursuant to a standing order from a physician or APRN. 

The Senate amended the bill to also establish a commission to study the use of Ivermectin to treat Covid-19 and to provide a recommendation regarding whether to make the standing order permanent.

HB 1131 (2022)

Prohibits public schools from adopting, enforcing, or implementing a policy that requires students or members of the public to wear a facial covering.

HB 1178 (2022)

Prohibits any state or local enforcement of any federal laws or actions aimed at limiting firearms.

SB 418 (2022)

Establishes "affidavit balloting" for voters who do not have a valid identification at the polls. Those voters would be given a prepaid envelope to return with documentation proving their eligibility to vote, and their "affidavit ballots" would be numbered and counted separately. Any voter who fails to provide documentation proving their eligibility to vote within ten days of the election would have their ballot pulled and their votes deducted from the official vote totals.

HB 1661 (2022)

Requires sending district schools and career and technical education (CTE) centers to enter into an agreement to include scheduling, access, transportation and credits for CTE students.

The House amended the bill to also set aside $35 million for a new legislative parking garage. The Senate revised the bill to lower this number to $9.35 million.

The Senate also amended this bill to add the substance of SB 430, an omnibus bill about care covered under Medicaid, childcare regulations, and more.

HB 1609 (2022)

Revises the law banning abortions after 24 weeks gestation to include exceptions for rape, incest, and fatal fetal anomalies. This bill also repeals the requirement to conduct an obstetric ultrasound before every abortion. Lastly, this bill requires the Department of Health and Human Services to compile and publish an annual report of statistics relative to abortions after 24 weeks.

HB 1455 (2022)

Prohibits state enforcement of any federal law, order, or rule that requires an individual, as a condition of employment or any other activity, to provide proof of vaccination against COVID-19 or to submit more than once per month to COVID-19 testing.

HB 1495 (2022)

Prohibits employee vaccine requirements for any state or local government employees or government contractors. This bill has an exception for medical providers when there is a direct threat present.

The House amended the bill to prohibit any state or local government from requiring businesses to implement a vaccine mandate, with an exception for medical facilities.

SB 298 (2022)

Repeals the law aimed at banning critical race theory in public schools and workplaces. That law prohibits the teaching of certain concepts in school and public employee trainings. For example, the law prohibits teaching that people of a certain race or sex are "inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously."

HB 1221 (2022)

Reduces the Business Profits Tax rate from 7.6% to 7.5% and the Business Enterprise Tax rate from 0.55% to 0.50% for taxable periods ending on or after December 31, 2023.

The House amended the bill to only cut the Business Profits Tax to 7.5%.

The Senate amended the bill to also provide towns and cities with 7.5% of their retirement contribution costs for teachers, police officers, and firefighters for one year.

HB 1080 (2022)

Creates a right for health care providers to conscientiously object to participating in providing abortion, sterilization, or artificial contraception services.

HB 1210 (2022)

Requires public employers, private employers, and postsecondary education institutions that receive public funds and mandate a vaccination or other inoculation procedure to accept an employee's or student's request for a medical, religious, or right of conscience exemption.

HB 227 (2021)

Allows a landlord to evict a tenant at the expiration of the term of the lease or tenancy, if the term is longer than six months.  The House amended the bill to also require the landlord to give 30 days' notice.

SB 137 (2021)

Changes the tipped minimum wage from 45% of the regular minimum wage to $3.27 per hour, if the federal government raises the regular minimum wage.  The Senate amended the bill to also set a fixed minimum wage of $7.25 per hour for tipped employees who are licensed as secondary game operators (such as croupiers); the House removed this amendment.

SB 61 (2021)

Right-to-work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union.

SB 89 (2021)

The House voted to add a new section to the bill that states New Hampshire election laws will not be affected by the passage of the federal "For the People Act."  Supporters argue that this is an important measure to protect the integrity of New Hampshire elections from federal interference.  Opponents argue it is unconstitutional to attempt to nullify federal laws, and this measure could require New Hampshire to run two separate election systems, one for state officials and one for federal officials.

HB 1 (2021)

State budget bill.  The governor presented his version of the next state budget February 11.  The House passed a revised version of his budget on April 7.  The Senate passed a different version on June 3.  The House and Senate passed a final version on June 24. Click here to read a summary of the 2021 budget proposals.

HB 2 (2021)

State budget bill (part 2). The governor presented his version of the next state budget February 11.  The House passed a revised version of his budget on April 7.  The Senate passed a different version on June 3. The House and Senate passed a final version on June 24.  Click here to read a summary of the budget proposals.

HB 542 (2021)

Excludes religious gatherings from any prohibition on in-person gatherings during a state of emergency.  The House amended the bill to more broadly protect religious activities. The Senate amended the bill to narrow its scope again; the Senate version requires the state to allow religious services and other activities to proceed to the same or greater extent as other essential business activity during a state of emergency.

HB 307 (2021)

Prohibits any "public entity," from school districts to local governments, from regulating the sale, use, or possession of firearms, knives, and related accessories.  The bill includes levels of fines and damages up to $10,000.

HB 177 (2021)

Prohibits the siting of new landfills, excluding expansions of existing landfills, within 2 miles of state parks. "State parks" do not include state historic sites and recreational rail trails.

The House voted to add this bill to SB 103, but the Senate rejected that change.

SB 80 (2021)

Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by House and Senate party leaders after an application process.

SB 141 (2021)

Authorizes the FBI to conduct all National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) searches concerning the purchase, sale, and transfer of firearms through Federal Firearm Licensees operating in New Hampshire. This bill then abolishes the "gun line" in the State Police and repeals the state’s partial point of contact system for handguns, allowing the authority to remain exclusively with the FBI.

HB 629 (2021)

Legalizes possession of up to 3/4 oz of marijuana for adults over age 21. This bill also allows adults to cultivate six marijuana plants at home and creates a $100 fine for publicly smoking marijuana.

HB 1672 (2020)

Allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, whether or not he or she will actually be absent on election day. The Senate amended the bill to become the "Coronavirus Election Protection Act of 2020." The amended bill allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, allows town officials to start processing ballots before Election Day, and authorizes online voter registration.

HB 1280 (2020)

Caps how much health insurers can charge consumers for insulin at $100 for a 30-day supply. The Senate amended the bill to instead cap the payment at $30 for a 30-day supply.

HB 1166 (2020)

Establishes a committee to study the demographics of the uninsured population in New Hampshire, the barriers to obtaining healthcare coverage, and possible solutions to extend health insurance coverage. The Senate completely amended the bill to add various requirements and protections for employers and employees related to the coronavirus. For example, the amended bill allows employees to collect unemployment if they cannot go to work because they or a family member is sick with COVID-19 - even if Gov. Sununu ends the state of emergency.

HB 1247 (2020)

Requires landlords to provide at least 90 days notice before a rent increase over 5%. The House amended the bill to require 60 days notice for an increase over 5% and 90 days notice for an increase over 8%. The Senate amended the bill to instead remove the requirement of an eviction notice before public welfare departments provide rental assistance. The amended bill also "creates a duty of good faith and fair dealing for mortgage lenders." Lastly, the amended bill requires landlords to offer tenants a 6-month repayment plan for rent missed during the coronavirus emergency.

HB 1645 (2020)

Extends the waiting period to annul a misdemeanor domestic violence offense, from 3 to 10 years. The Senate amended the bill to incorporate several other pieces of legislation.

HB 1454 (2020)

Gives local school boards the power to determine whether to grant academic credit for alternative extended learning and work-based programs. At the time of this bill's submission, that power lies with the state board of education. The Senate amended the bill to still require the state board of education to vet and approve alternative extended learning and work-based programs, which local school boards "may" accept for credit (similar to a different bill, SB 514).

HB 1264 (2020)

Extends the Commission on the Seacoast Cancer Investigation from 2020 to 2022. The Senate amended the legislation to incorporate several bills related to PFAS. In particular, the amended bill establishes maximum contaminant levels for perflourinated compounds (PFCs), as originally written in SB 287.

HB 514 (2019)

Establishes a seven day waiting period for the delivery of a firearm. There are some exceptions for rifle or shotgun purchases by hunters, law enforcement officers, and members of the armed forces. The Senate amended the bill, shortening the waiting period to three days.

SB 1 (2019)

Establishes a paid family and medical leave insurance program, which would be run by the state department of employment security. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. The bill does not allow anyone to opt-out of the program.

HB 2 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill (part 2).

HB 1 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill.

HB 364 (2019)

Permits qualifying patients and registered caregivers to grow medicinal marijuana at home.

HB 564 (2019)

Makes it a misdemeanor to carry a firearm in a safe school zone. ˙There are some exceptions, for example if a person gets permission from the school board. The House amended the bill so that parents do not need to remove or unload firearms in their cars when picking up students. The amendment also specifically bans firearms on "school property" rather than in "school zones." School property includes buildings, grounds, school buses, and vans.

SB 290 (2019)

Modifies the work and community engagement requirements for the Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. For example, this bill extends the work requirement exemption for parents so that parents of children under age 13 are eligible for the exemption. This bill also gives the Department of Health and Human Services the authority to waive the work requirement until July 2021 if there is an inability to communicate with program participants.

HB 109 (2019)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks. Also requires private sales or transfers to go through a licensed firearm dealer, if it’s not absolutely clear that both the owner and the recipient are allowed to own guns.

SB 10 (2019)

Increases the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020, then to $11 in 2022, except starting that year, employers would have to pay at least $12 per hour if they do not offer at least 10 paid sick days to employees.  The House and Senate amended the bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020 and $12 per hour in 2022, regardless of sick time.

HB 455 (2019)

Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole.

HB 105 (2019)

Generally repeals the voter registration changes passed in SB 3. For example, this bill removes the stricter requirements for voters who register within 30 days of an election. This bill also removes much of the new language on voter registration forms about domicile. This bill also removes the authority of the secretary of state to conduct post-election voter registration investigations, leaving that to the attorney general.

HB 687 (2019)

Establishes "extreme risk protection orders," based on evidence that there is "a significant risk of causing bodily injury to himself or herself or others," which would require the subject of the order to surrender any firearms to law enforcement.

HB 712 (2019)

Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.

HB 731 (2019)

Gradually raises the state minimum wage, starting at $12 per hour in 2020 and ending at $15 per hour in 2024. The bill also raises the tipped minimum wage, although in 2024 it would still be 45% of the regular minimum wage. The bill requires cost of living adjustments every year. This bill also allows cities and towns to set a higher minimum wage. Lastly, this bill establishes a "training wage," no lower than $8.50, for employees under age eighteen for the first three months of employment.

HB 685 (2019)

Prohibits balance billing for ambulance services. The bill also limits reimbursement for ambulance services to a "commercially reasonable value." The Senate amended the bill to instead require insurance plans which cover maternity benefits to provide coverage for emergency or elective abortion services (similar to SB 486).

HB 1696 (2016)

Continues expanded Medicaid eligibility, with some revisions. This bill adds work requirements to eligibility for expanded Medicaid. Additional funding is provided by the insurance premium tax, paid by insurance companies.

HB 1480 (2016)

Raises the minimum wage to $8.25 in 2017, $9 in 2018, and $9.50 in 2019.

HB 1374 (2016)

Requires moneys paid into the Renewable Energy Fund to be rebated to ratepayers, rather than spent on other renewable energy projects.

HB 1623 (2016)

Prohibits abortion based on genetic abnormality.

HB 1338 (2016)

Allows parents and guardians to opt their students out of the statewide assessment test, and prohibits schools and the state from penalizing students who do not take statewide assessments.

HB 1694 (2016)

Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one.

SB 336 (2016)

Removes the phrase "suitable person" from the law governing concealed carry permits, and instead requires law enforcement to issue a permit so long as the person is not prohibited from owning a firearm by state or federal law.

HB 1616 (2016)

Allows a person obtaining a driver's license to choose whether the license complies with the federal Real ID Act of 2005.

SB 576 (2016)

This bill includes many regulations aimed at combating heroin and prescription drug abuse. For example, this bill increases the penalties for abusing fentanyl and provides funding for an upgrade to the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.

SB 498 (2016)

Reduces the penalty for possessing 1/4 ounce or less of marijuana from a class A to an unspecified misdemeanor.

SB 116 (2015)

Increases the length of time for which a license to carry a concealed firearm is valid, and repeals the requirement to obtain a license to carry a concealed firearm.

HB 658 (2015)

Right-to-Work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union.

SB 113 (2015)

Authorizes two casinos in New Hampshire. One destination casino would pay a $80 million license fee; a smaller casino would pay $40 million to the state. SB 113 also earmarks $25 million in casino profits for distribution to all New Hampshire municipalities.

SB 40 (2015)

Includes fetuses as potential victims under murder statutes.  The original Senate version of the bill applied to "viable fetuses," meaning the fetus is old enough to survive outside the womb.  The House revised the bill to apply to all fetuses eight weeks and older.  The House and Senate did not agree on a final version of the bill.

HB 593 (2015)

Permits qualifying patients and registered caregivers to grow medicinal marijuana at home.

HB 563 (2015)

Adjusts the additional grants for chartered public school pupils based on the Consumer Price Index, and increases the per pupil state funding for charter school students by $1,000.

SB 179 (2015)

Requires that a voter has lived in the state and county for at least 30 days.

SB 4 (2015)

Tightens the definition of domicile for the purpose of voting.  In particular, the final version of this bill requires a voter to live in New Hampshire at least 10 days before voting.

SB 169 (2015)

Forbids the use of EBT cards or cash from EBT cards for alcohol, tobacco, gambling, lottery tickets, tattoos, firearms, or adult entertainment.

HB 1 (2015)

2016-2017 state budget bill (part 1).  The budget cuts business taxes, restores the Rainy Day Fund, and increases funding for some social services.  The budget does not reauthorize Medicaid expansion or include a pay raise negotiated with state employees.

SB 30 (2015)

Extends the use of municipal economic development and revitalization districts to certain unincorporated places.

SB 106 (2015)

Prohibits the sale, use, or possession of synthetic drugs, such as "spice."

HB 136 (2015)

Prohibits tanning facilities from tanning anyone under age 18. At the time of this bill's submission, the law allowed tanning under age 18 with a parent or guardian's consent.

HB 684 (2015)

Raises the minimum wage to $9.10 in 2016, $11.40 in 2017, and $14.25 in 2018. Starting in 2019, the minimum wage is adjusted according to cost of living.

SB 101 (2015)

Prohibits the Department of Education and the state Board of Education from implementing the Common Core standards in any school or school district in this state.

HB 618 (2015)

Decriminalizes possession of 1/2 ounce or less of marijuana, with additional penalties for violators under age twenty-one.

HB 403 (2015)

Repeals the law establishing a protest-free buffer zone around reproductive health clinics.

SB 318 (2014)

Establishes the crime of domestic violence.

HB 1633 (2014)

Authorizes one casino in New Hampshire, regulated by the Gaming Commission.

HB 1625 (2014)

Decriminalizes possession of one ounce or less of marijuana, with additional penalties for violators under age twenty-one.

HB 1486 (2014)

Decreases the fine for underage drinking from $300 to $100 on first offense and from $600 to $300 on a subsequent offense.

HB 1294 (2014)

Requires Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield to allow any health provider into their network for the purpose of participating in the online health insurance exchange.

HB 1508 (2014)

Terminates New Hampshire’s participation in the Common Core educational standards.

SB 413 (2014)

Expands Medicaid eligibility, using private insurance wherever possible.

HB 1403 (2014)

Raises the minimum wage, starting at $9 per hour.

HB 1170 (2014)

Repeals the death penalty.

HB 1602 (2014)

Givies the Public Utilities Commission the power to force PSNH to sell its power plants. This bill also requires the state Site Evaluation Committee to address scenic impacts, sound impacts, fire protection plans, and more when evaluating wind farm proposals.

SB 207 (2014)

“Pay Equity Law,” a bill to combat pay discrimination based on gender, forbidding employers from restricting employees from discussing wages, and allowing a three year deadline to report pay discrimination to the state (current deadline is one year).

SB 319 (2014)

Authorizes "buffer zones" for protestors around reproductive health clinics.

HB 1503 (2014)

Originally written to include fetuses eight weeks and older as potential victims under first and second degree murder, manslaughter, negligent homicide, and causing or aiding suicide.  The House amended the bill to instead increase penalties for for manslaughter or negligent homicide causing a miscarriage or stillbirth.

HB 1411 (2014)

Sends some of last year's budget surplus to the Department of Health and Human Services.

HB 1360 (2014)

Forbids cell phone use while driving, unless hands-free.

SB 367 (2014)

Increases the gas tax by four-cents per gallon and removes the toll at Exit 12 in Merrimack.

SB 3 (2014)

Removes all tolls in Merrimack.

SB 203 (2014)

Forbids the use of EBT cards or cash from EBT cards for alcohol, tobacco, lottery tickets, firearms, or adult entertainment.

HB 323 (2013)

Right-to-Work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union.

HB 451 (2013)

Increases the length of time for which a license to carry a concealed firearm is valid, and repeals the requirement to obtain a license to carry a concealed firearm.

SB 153 (2013)

Gives the legislature power to review collective bargaining agreements entered into by the state.

HB 1 (2013)

Final 2014-2015 state budget, including increased funding for higher education, increased funding for services for individuals with mental illness and/or other disabilities, no Medicaid expansion, and no gas tax increase.

HB 306 (2013)

Changes RGGI to dedicate some of the proceeds to ratepayer rebates, and lowering the cap on carbon emissions, which will raise the cost of carbon credits to utilities and utility bills to consumers.

HB 271 (2013)

Forbids NH from expanding Medicaid eligibility under the federal Affordable Care Act.

HB 573 (2013)

Allows medicinal use of marijuana, without allowing home growing.

HB 501 (2013)

Sets the state minimum wage at $7.25, in place of federal minimum wage.

HB 630 (2013)

Reallocates proceeds from RGGI to the low-income energy efficiency program.

HB 2 (2013)

Makes various appropriations related to the budget bill, and establishes commissions to study Medicaid expansion and casino regulations.

SB 1 (2013)

Increases the Research and Development tax credit.

SB 163 (2013)

Establishes a commission to recommend legislation to prepare for projected sea level rise and other coastal and coastal watershed hazards.

HB 135 (2013)

Limits the use of deadly force, repealing "Stand Your Ground" in favor of the "Castle Doctrine." Under this bill victims could use deadly force within their homes without retreating, but anywhere else they would have to attempt retreat before resorting to deadly force.

HB 370 (2013)

Repeals the education tax credit program, in which businesses receive tax breaks for contributing to a scholarship fund for low income students that wish to attend private school.

HB 595 (2013)

Revises 2011 voter ID law to delay requirement that poll workers photograph voters without ID; also allows student ID at polls.

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