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Historical Details

Position on Issues

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"I oppose a ban on abortion after 20 weeks gestation, even with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 24 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?

"I support expanded commuter rail."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

"I support term limits for New Hampshire elected officials."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?

"Heroin is just part of the problem. I believe we need to do a better job of funding and making medication-based treatment available to those addicted to prescription opioids, fentanyl, heroin, and similar drugs."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH add an income tax on earned income?

"Again, I think we need to look at the circumstances and the alternatives."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?

"I think we need to look at the circumstances. I don't believe in painting the state into a corner. As a matter of policy, I don't support sales taxes because I feel they are regressive."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire lower business taxes?

"Undecided"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add a tax on capital gains?

"NH is the only New England state without a capital gains tax, which only would apply to people who have already realized a substantial gain. In a revenue crisis or to address disparities in public education funding we should take a serious look at this."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the tax on cigarettes?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add restrictions to the governor's powers during a state of emergency?

"Undecided"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire extend the renewable portfolio standard past 2025, requiring public utilities to obtain more than 25% of electricity from renewable energy sources?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase public access to reports of police misconduct?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Do you support the option of mail-in ballots for all voters, not just absentees?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?

"I support expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire raise the minimum wage?

"For"

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"I will oppose efforts at the state level to outlaw abortions or to add new restrictions or layers of bureaucracy for women seeking them. This decision should always be 100% up to the women making it."

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"We must do more to make our highest in the nation in-state university tuition more affordable. College should be a gateway to opportunity, not a trap door leading to years of crippling debt."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?

"I oppose increased state enforcement of federal immigration laws."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the size of solar panel installations that may participate in net energy metering?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment?

"I would rather see NH attract employers by providing access to modern infrastructure and a well-educated workforce."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the base amount of per-pupil funding it provides to local school districts?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Is police brutality an issue in NH?

"I am undecided on this issue."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Do you support Gov. Sununu's proposal to allow employers and employees to opt-in to a private, paid family and medical leave insurance plan, based on a pool of state employees, excluding coverage for personal illness?

"What the governor is suggesting is a voluntary benefit where ALL of the people signing up would be people with available disposable income after health care and retirement savings vs. the working people who need this protection."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire maintain the renewable portfolio standard, which requires public utilities in New Hampshire to obtain a certain percentage of electricity from renewable energy sources (25% by 2025)?

"I support the renewable portfolio standard in New Hampshire."

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"This is an incredibly short sighted decision that undermines the financial stability of unions-which have combatted the worst excesses of business and government and played a huge role ensuring the internal stability of our country since the late 1900's. This is not about choice or free speech. It is ALL about the simple exercise of raw political power designed to pit worker against worker in an effort to still their collective voices. An America with weakened labor unions is a weakened America."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire create a road usage fee?

"Undecided"

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"The aging Seabrook nuclear power plant is a disaster waiting to happen. I support efforts to deny NRC extension of its license and to update monitoring equipment and the evacuation plan."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire government do more to increase the supply of affordable housing?

"New Hampshire government should do more to increase the supply of affordable housing."

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"I support continuing the state of New Hampshire's contract with Planned Parenthood and will stand with this organization in its efforts to promote women's health and protect reproductive freedom."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?

"I am undecided on this issue."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire create a statewide family and medical leave program, paid for with a percentage of employee wages, with no opt-out?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire provide student loan debt repayment programs for workers in industries with labor shortages?

"Undecided"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add tax incentives for affordable housing development?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?

"I believe if you live in NH and meet the age and citizenship requirements, you should be able to participate in our democracy and vote in NH elections. The residency requirements recently enacted in the legislature unfairly make it more difficult for college students, homeless people, and people in transition to exercise their right to vote. I would support overturning or changing these laws to make them fairer and would also support efforts to make it easier and simpler for qualified people to register and to vote."

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse from the 2018 election through the end of the legislative session in 2020. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. "Prime sponsored bills that became law" include bill texts that were incorporated into "omnibus" bills following the coronavirus emergency.

Session days attended
100% Present
Average 91%
Party unity score/partisanship
99% With Party
Average 95%
Participated in official roll call votes
100% Roll Call Votes
Average 86%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
4 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 3
Prime sponsored bills that became law
1 Became Law
Average 1

Voting Record

SB 89 (2021)

The House voted to add a new section to the bill that states New Hampshire election laws will not be affected by the passage of the federal "For the People Act."  Supporters argue that this is an important measure to protect the integrity of New Hampshire elections from federal interference.  Opponents argue it is unconstitutional to attempt to nullify federal laws, and this measure could require New Hampshire to run two separate election systems, one for state officials and one for federal officials.

HB 227 (2021)

Allows a landlord to evict a tenant at the expiration of the term of the lease or tenancy, if the term is longer than six months.  The House amended the bill to also require the landlord to give 30 days' notice.

HB 625 (2021)

Prohibits abortion after 24 weeks gestation, unless there is a medical emergency.  There are no exceptions for rape or incest.

The House and Senate added a similar ban to the 2021 state budget bill.

SB 61 (2021)

Right-to-work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union.

HB 1 (2021)

State budget bill.  The governor presented his version of the next state budget February 11.  The House passed a revised version of his budget on April 7.  The Senate passed a different version on June 3.  The House and Senate passed a final version on June 24. Click here to read a summary of the 2021 budget proposals.

HB 2 (2021)

State budget bill (part 2). The governor presented his version of the next state budget February 11.  The House passed a revised version of his budget on April 7.  The Senate passed a different version on June 3. The House and Senate passed a final version on June 24.  Click here to read a summary of the budget proposals.

HB 542 (2021)

Excludes religious gatherings from any prohibition on in-person gatherings during a state of emergency.  The House amended the bill to more broadly protect religious activities. The Senate amended the bill to narrow its scope again; the Senate version requires the state to allow religious services and other activities to proceed to the same or greater extent as other essential business activity during a state of emergency.

HB 177 (2021)

Prohibits the siting of new landfills, excluding expansions of existing landfills, within 2 miles of state parks. "State parks" do not include state historic sites and recreational rail trails.

The House voted to add this bill to SB 103, but the Senate rejected that change.

HB 121 (2021)

Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by House and Senate party leaders after an application process.

HB 458 (2021)

Repeals the the law that requires public middle schools and high schools to provide menstrual hygiene products at no cost. This bill then permits school health departments "to make reasonable efforts to secure, through grants and donations, and distribute menstrual hygiene products to students in need."

SB 141 (2021)

Authorizes the FBI to conduct all National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) searches concerning the purchase, sale, and transfer of firearms through Federal Firearm Licensees operating in New Hampshire. This bill then abolishes the "gun line" in the State Police and repeals the state’s partial point of contact system for handguns, allowing the authority to remain exclusively with the FBI.

HB 1247 (2020)

Requires landlords to provide at least 90 days notice before a rent increase over 5%. The House amended the bill to require 60 days notice for an increase over 5% and 90 days notice for an increase over 8%. The Senate amended the bill to instead remove the requirement of an eviction notice before public welfare departments provide rental assistance. The amended bill also "creates a duty of good faith and fair dealing for mortgage lenders." Lastly, the amended bill requires landlords to offer tenants a 6-month repayment plan for rent missed during the coronavirus emergency.

HB 1672 (2020)

Allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, whether or not he or she will actually be absent on election day. The Senate amended the bill to become the "Coronavirus Election Protection Act of 2020." The amended bill allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, allows town officials to start processing ballots before Election Day, and authorizes online voter registration.

HB 1577 (2020)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. Parental permission is required if a minor seeks a birth certificate change. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate.

HB 1280 (2020)

Caps how much health insurers can charge consumers for insulin at $100 for a 30-day supply. The Senate amended the bill to instead cap the payment at $30 for a 30-day supply.

HB 1166 (2020)

Establishes a committee to study the demographics of the uninsured population in New Hampshire, the barriers to obtaining healthcare coverage, and possible solutions to extend health insurance coverage. The Senate completely amended the bill to add various requirements and protections for employers and employees related to the coronavirus. For example, the amended bill allows employees to collect unemployment if they cannot go to work because they or a family member is sick with COVID-19 - even if Gov. Sununu ends the state of emergency.

HB 1664 (2020)

Requires the Department of Environmental Services to establish a climate action plan, an office of the environmental advocate, and an oversight commission on environmental services. The House amended the bill to instead establish greenhouse gas emission reduction goals for the state. Those goals are a 20% reduction in statewide emissions by 2025, 50% by 2035, and 80% by 2050 (all compared to 1990 emissions). The amended bill also gives the Department of Environmental Services the authority to develop and update regularly a climate action plan.

HB 1645 (2020)

Extends the waiting period to annul a misdemeanor domestic violence offense, from 3 to 10 years. The Senate amended the bill to incorporate several other pieces of legislation.

HB 1454 (2020)

Gives local school boards the power to determine whether to grant academic credit for alternative extended learning and work-based programs. At the time of this bill's submission, that power lies with the state board of education. The Senate amended the bill to still require the state board of education to vet and approve alternative extended learning and work-based programs, which local school boards "may" accept for credit (similar to a different bill, SB 514).

HB 1264 (2020)

Extends the Commission on the Seacoast Cancer Investigation from 2020 to 2022. The Senate amended the legislation to incorporate several bills related to PFAS. In particular, the amended bill establishes maximum contaminant levels for perflourinated compounds (PFCs), as originally written in SB 287.

HB 1648 (2020)

Permits adults to possess up to 3/4 of an ounce of cannabis, 5 grams of hashish, and other cannabis-infused products, and permits adults to grow up to 6 cannabis plants at home in a secure location that is not visible from other properties. This bill also allows adults to give marijuana products away and sell marijuana accessories.

HB 514 (2019)

Establishes a seven day waiting period for the delivery of a firearm. There are some exceptions for rifle or shotgun purchases by hunters, law enforcement officers, and members of the armed forces. The Senate amended the bill, shortening the waiting period to three days.

HB 706 (2019)

Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by the secretary of state after a public application process that includes input from legislative leaders. The Senate amended the bill, generally giving the Secretary of State less say in the process.

SB 1 (2019)

Establishes a paid family and medical leave insurance program, which would be run by the state department of employment security. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. The bill does not allow anyone to opt-out of the program.

HB 2 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill (part 2).

HB 1 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill.

HB 564 (2019)

Makes it a misdemeanor to carry a firearm in a safe school zone. ˙There are some exceptions, for example if a person gets permission from the school board. The House amended the bill so that parents do not need to remove or unload firearms in their cars when picking up students. The amendment also specifically bans firearms on "school property" rather than in "school zones." School property includes buildings, grounds, school buses, and vans.

SB 290 (2019)

Modifies the work and community engagement requirements for the Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. For example, this bill extends the work requirement exemption for parents so that parents of children under age 13 are eligible for the exemption. This bill also gives the Department of Health and Human Services the authority to waive the work requirement until July 2021 if there is an inability to communicate with program participants.

HB 109 (2019)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks. Also requires private sales or transfers to go through a licensed firearm dealer, if it’s not absolutely clear that both the owner and the recipient are allowed to own guns.

HB 365 (2019)

Increases the electric generating capacity of customer generators who may participate in net energy metering, generally from 1 megawatt to 5 megawatts.

HB 481 (2019)

Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. A Cannabis Control Commission, similar to the Liquor Commission, would be responsible for licensing and enforcement. The bill also allows limited home-growing of marijuana for personal use.

HB 446 (2019)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate. The Senate amended the bill, for example to require the permission of a parent or guardian if a minor seeks a birth certificate change.

SB 10 (2019)

Increases the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020, then to $11 in 2022, except starting that year, employers would have to pay at least $12 per hour if they do not offer at least 10 paid sick days to employees.  The House and Senate amended the bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020 and $12 per hour in 2022, regardless of sick time.

HB 455 (2019)

Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole.

HB 105 (2019)

Generally repeals the voter registration changes passed in SB 3. For example, this bill removes the stricter requirements for voters who register within 30 days of an election. This bill also removes much of the new language on voter registration forms about domicile. This bill also removes the authority of the secretary of state to conduct post-election voter registration investigations, leaving that to the attorney general.

HB 558 (2019)

Prohibits food service businesses from providing a single-use plastic straw to a customer unless specifically requested.

HB 687 (2019)

Establishes "extreme risk protection orders," based on evidence that there is "a significant risk of causing bodily injury to himself or herself or others," which would require the subject of the order to surrender any firearms to law enforcement.

HB 712 (2019)

Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.

HB 731 (2019)

Gradually raises the state minimum wage, starting at $12 per hour in 2020 and ending at $15 per hour in 2024. The bill also raises the tipped minimum wage, although in 2024 it would still be 45% of the regular minimum wage. The bill requires cost of living adjustments every year. This bill also allows cities and towns to set a higher minimum wage. Lastly, this bill establishes a "training wage," no lower than $8.50, for employees under age eighteen for the first three months of employment.

HB 685 (2019)

Prohibits balance billing for ambulance services. The bill also limits reimbursement for ambulance services to a "commercially reasonable value." The Senate amended the bill to instead require insurance plans which cover maternity benefits to provide coverage for emergency or elective abortion services (similar to SB 486).

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