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Historical Details

Position on Issues

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the “Education Freedom Account” program, which gives students access to the per-pupil share of state school funding to spend on private school or home school expenses?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"I oppose a ban on abortion after 20 weeks gestation, even with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 24 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?

"I support expanded commuter rail."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

"I support term limits for New Hampshire elected officials."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?

"Heroin is just part of the problem. I believe we need to do a better job of funding and making medication-based treatment available to those addicted to prescription opioids, fentanyl, heroin, and similar drugs."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban abortions during the first trimester (e.g. after 6 weeks gestation)?

"Every person making this decision should have the right to make their choice based on their own personal situation and moral/religious code. Using the power of the state to enforce the religious beliefs of others on an entire class of citizens is un-American."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban abortions during the second trimester (e.g. after 15 weeks gestation)?

"Every person making this decision should have the right to make their choice based on their own personal situation and moral/religious code. Using the power of the state to enforce the religious beliefs of others on an entire class of citizens is un-American."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire ban discussions about sexual orientation and gender identity in grades K-3?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the state law that bans teaching certain concepts, such as the idea that people may be "inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously"?

"Cramming a racist law masquerading as an anti-discrimination law into the state budget was one of the worst things the legislature did in 2021."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should NH add an income tax on earned income?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire add a tax credit for businesses that contribute to student loan repayment for employees?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire lower business taxes?

"The focus needs to turn to lowering property taxes."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add a tax on capital gains?

"NH is the only New England state without a capital gains tax, which only would apply to people who have already realized a substantial gain. In a revenue crisis or to address disparities in public education funding we should take a serious look at this."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the tax on cigarettes?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire government do more to address climate change?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support giving voters who register without ID on Election Day a ballot that only counts if they return identifying documents to the state before a deadline?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire add a fee or mileage charge for electric vehicle owners to help pay for transportation and/or electric infrastructure?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add restrictions to the governor's powers during a state of emergency?

"Undecided"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should the state do more to encourage municipalities to remove zoning barriers to housing development?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire extend the renewable portfolio standard past 2025, requiring public utilities to obtain more than 25% of electricity from renewable energy sources?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire guarantee the right to access abortion before 24 weeks?

"Every person making this decision should have the right to make their choice based on their own personal situation and moral/religious code. Using the power of the state to enforce the religious beliefs of others on an entire class of citizens is un-American."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase public access to reports of police misconduct?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the option of mail-in ballots for all voters, not just absentees?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by allowing home-growing and private use without sales?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by licensing growers and private retail locations?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire legalize the recreational use of marijuana by establishing state-run cannabis stores?

"Undecided"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?

"I support expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire raise the minimum wage?

"For"

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"I will oppose efforts at the state level to outlaw abortions or to add new restrictions or layers of bureaucracy for women seeking them. This decision should always be 100% up to the women making it."

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"We must do more to make our highest in the nation in-state university tuition more affordable. College should be a gateway to opportunity, not a trap door leading to years of crippling debt."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?

"I oppose increased state enforcement of federal immigration laws."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the size of solar panel installations that may participate in net energy metering?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment?

"I would rather see NH attract employers by providing access to modern infrastructure and a well-educated workforce."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire increase the base amount of per-pupil funding it provides to local school districts?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should the state permanently increase how much tax revenue it shares with towns and cities every year, beyond public school funding?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the gradual phase-out of the Interests and Dividends tax?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Is police brutality an issue in NH?

"I am undecided on this issue."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Do you support Gov. Sununu's proposal to allow employers and employees to opt-in to a private, paid family and medical leave insurance plan, based on a pool of state employees, excluding coverage for personal illness?

"What the governor is suggesting is a voluntary benefit where ALL of the people signing up would be people with available disposable income after health care and retirement savings vs. the working people who need this protection."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Do you support the state’s current system of public school funding, with each district’s total funding primarily dependent on local property tax revenue?

"The current system creates disparities between kids living in property rich towns vs. property poor towns. Opportunities shouldn't be dependent on zip code."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire maintain the renewable portfolio standard, which requires public utilities in New Hampshire to obtain a certain percentage of electricity from renewable energy sources (25% by 2025)?

"I support the renewable portfolio standard in New Hampshire."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should New Hampshire repeal the ban on abortion after 24 weeks gestation?

"Every person making this decision should have the right to make their choice based on their own personal situation and moral/religious code. Using the power of the state to enforce the religious beliefs of others on an entire class of citizens is un-American."

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"This is an incredibly short sighted decision that undermines the financial stability of unions-which have combatted the worst excesses of business and government and played a huge role ensuring the internal stability of our country since the late 1900's. This is not about choice or free speech. It is ALL about the simple exercise of raw political power designed to pit worker against worker in an effort to still their collective voices. An America with weakened labor unions is a weakened America."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire create a road usage fee?

"Undecided"

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"The aging Seabrook nuclear power plant is a disaster waiting to happen. I support efforts to deny NRC extension of its license and to update monitoring equipment and the evacuation plan."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should New Hampshire government do more to increase the supply of affordable housing?

"New Hampshire government should do more to increase the supply of affordable housing."

Candidate's Facebook Page, 2018

"I support continuing the state of New Hampshire's contract with Planned Parenthood and will stand with this organization in its efforts to promote women's health and protect reproductive freedom."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?

"I am undecided on this issue."

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire create a statewide family and medical leave program, paid for with a percentage of employee wages, with no opt-out?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2022

Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire provide student loan debt repayment programs for workers in industries with labor shortages?

"Undecided"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire add tax incentives for affordable housing development?

"For"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2020

Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?

"Against"

Citizens Count Issue Survey, 2018

Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?

"I believe if you live in NH and meet the age and citizenship requirements, you should be able to participate in our democracy and vote in NH elections. The residency requirements recently enacted in the legislature unfairly make it more difficult for college students, homeless people, and people in transition to exercise their right to vote. I would support overturning or changing these laws to make them fairer and would also support efforts to make it easier and simpler for qualified people to register and to vote."

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse in 2021 and 2022. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber.
Session days attended
100% Present
Average 91%
Party unity score/partisanship
99% With Party
Average 94%
Participated in official roll call votes
99% Roll Call Votes
Average 88%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
3 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 3
Prime sponsored bills that became law
0 Became Law
Average 1

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this legislator's activities at the Statehouse from the 2018 election through the end of the legislative session in 2020. The measures are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. "Prime sponsored bills that became law" include bill texts that were incorporated into "omnibus" bills following the coronavirus emergency.

Session days attended
100% Present
Average 91%
Party unity score/partisanship
99% With Party
Average 95%
Participated in official roll call votes
100% Roll Call Votes
Average 86%
Bills sponsored (as prime sponsor)
4 Prime Sponsored Bills
Average 3
Prime sponsored bills that became law
1 Became Law
Average 1

Voting Record

HB 619 (2023)

Prohibits gender transition care for minors under age 18. This bill also prohibits teaching about gender identity in public schools (with an exception for high school psychology courses), requires schools to use the name and gender that students are enrolled as, prohibits students from participating on sports teams that do not correspond to their biological sex at birth, and requires students to use the bathroom that corresponds with their biological sex at birth.

HB 1205 (2024)

Prohibits anyone with the reproductive biology and genetics of a male at birth from participating on school sports teams designated for females. As introduced, this bill covered K-12 schools as well as the university and community college system. The House amended the bill so that it only applies to middle and high schools.

HB 1419 (2024)

Prohibits K-12 schools from making "any material that is harmful to minors" available to students. The bill defines this material to include various content related to sex. This bill also requires school boards to adopt complaint resolution policies to address complaints regarding harmful material by parents or guardians.

HB 1248 (2024)

Changes the state limit on abortion after 24 weeks gestation to 15 days gestation.

HB 1377 (2024)

Right-to-work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union.

CACR 23 (2024)

Constitutional amendment creating a right to abortion, including a ban on any restrictions on abortion prior to 24 weeks.

HB 1656 (2024)

Greatly increases the per-pupil state education funding for each student receiving special education services. The House amended the bill to establish three weighted categories for special education differentiated aid, with more funding going to students who need more services.

HB 1283 (2024)

Establishes a procedure for an individual with terminal illness to receive medical assistance in dying through the self administration of medication (sometimes called physician-assisted suicide). The bill establishes criteria for the prescription of such medication and establishes reporting requirements and penalties for misuse or noncompliance.

HB 1145 (2024)

Prohibits new solid waste landfill permits in the state for facilities owned by any person other than the state of New Hampshire or a political subdivision thereof.

HB 1649 (2024)

Restricts the use of per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in consumer products. For example, this bill bans the sale of cosmetics, food packing, carpets, and more products with added PFAS starting July 1, 2028. The House changed that date to January 1, 2027.

The Senate amended the bill to also state that settlement funds from PFAS lawsuits will be deposited in the drinking water and groundwater trust fund and used to fund public water systems impacted by PFAS.

HB 1322 (2024)

Gradually increases the minimum wage to $17 per hour by 2029. This bill then allows future increases best on the Northeast Consumer Price Index. This bill also increases the tipped minimum wage from 45% to 50% of the regular minimum wage.

HB 1291 (2024)

Increases the number of accessory dwelling units (ADUs) allowed by right from one to two. This bill also increases the maximum square footage from 750 square feet to 1,000 square feet (and 850 square feet for a second unit). The bill then sets other regulations municipalities can and cannot require for ADUs. For example, the bill states that municipalities may require a property to have at least one half acre to have more than one ADU.

HB 470 (2023)

Exempts some drug checking equipment from the definition of drug paraphernalia, and allows the use of drug checking equipment, such as fentanyl test strips, for harm reduction.

SB 263 (2023)

Permanently reauthorizes the New Hampshire Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. Previous law ended the program on December 31, 2023. This bill also reestablishes and revises the commission to evaluate the New Hampshire Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid.

HB 1711 (2024)

Establishes a system to report to the firearm background check system if a person is found not guilty by reason of insanity, not competent to stand trial, or involuntarily committed to a mental health facility. This bill also allows the court to order a person to surrender their firearms in these circumstances. This bill also establishes a process for a person to have their record removed from the background check system after six months, if they are no longer a danger to themselves or others.

HB 10 (2023)

Establishes a parental bill of rights. Some of the parental rights in this bill include:
"The right to direct the education and care of his or her minor child"
"The right to be physically present at any health care facility ... at which their minor child is receiving hospital care"
"The right to consent in writing before a biometric scan of his or her minor child is made, shared, or stored"

HB 367 (2023)

Increases the maximum household income limit for participation in the Education Freedom Account program, from 300% to 500% of the federal poverty guidelines. The Education Freedom Account program allows families to spend the state's per-pupil share of education funding on private or home school expenses.

The House amended the bill to only increase the income limit to 350% of the federal poverty guidelines.

SB 272 (2023)

Establishes a parental bill of rights in education. Some of the parental rights in this bill include:
"The right to access and review all medical records of a child maintained by a school or school personnel"
"The right to inquire of the school or school personnel and to be truthfully and completely informed if the child is being identified or referred to by school district staff, as being of a gender other than that of which the child was identified or referred when enrolled"

HB 2 (2023)

State budget bill (part 2). The governor presented his proposal for the next state budget February 14. The House and Senate both made changes to that proposal. Click here to read a summary of the 2023 budget process.

HB 208 (2023)

Establishes greenhouse gas emission reduction goals for the state, to net zero by 2050. This bill also requires the Department of Environmental Services to develop a climate action plan by July 1, 2024, that includes evaluation of best available information, considers inclusion of strategies, programs and compliance mechanisms with measurable goals and targets, considers opportunities to encourage investment in low/moderate income, rural and minority communities, makes recommendations on retraining and apprenticeship opportunities, and coordinates with other state agencies.

HB 106 (2023)

Establishes a procedure for issuing "extreme risk protection orders" to protect against persons who pose an immediate risk of harm to themselves or others. An extreme risk protection order would restrict a person's access to firearms, and is also known as a "red flag law."

HB 59 (2023)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks.

HB 557 (2023)

Removes the authority of the Department of Health and Human Services to require vaccinations beyond those in state law. This bill specifically notes that the requirements for chickenpox, Hepatitis B, and Hib vaccinations will expire in 2026.

HB 639 (2023)

Legalizes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. The bill allows limited home-growing of marijuana. A new Cannabis Commission would oversee licensing and regulations related to the manufacture, testing, and sale of legal marijuana. Cannabis sales would be taxed under the Meals and Rooms tax system. Alternative Treatment Centers, which currently serve the state's medical marijuana patients, would be allowed to apply for a "dual use certificate" that allows them to participate in recreational marijuana business. Towns could limit marijuana businesses.

HB 523 (2023)

Increases the maximum electric generating capacity to participate in net energy metering, from one to five megawatts. This bill also modifies the transition of tariffs applicable to some customer-generators.

HB 57 (2023)

Gradually raises the minimum wage to $15 per hour over the next three years, with future adjustments based on the consumer price index. This bill also raises the tipped minimum wage from 45% to 50% of the regular minimum wage. Lastly, this bill allows a minimum wage of $8 per hour for youth under age 18 for the first six months of employment.

HB 224 (2023)

Repeals the civil and criminal penalties for health care providers who violate the state's ban on abortion after 24 weeks.

HB 624 (2023)

Requires state and local law enforcement to notify the public before an immigration checkpoint.

HB 567 (2023)

Requires at least 30 days written notice for a rent increase. Large, multi-unit rental owners must provide at least 60 days notice. If the rent increase is over 15%, large multi-unit landlords must provide at least 6 months notice.

HB 1431 (2022)

Establishes a parental bill of rights. Some of the parental rights in this bill include:

HB 227 (2021)

Allows a landlord to evict a tenant at the expiration of the term of the lease or tenancy, if the term is longer than six months.  The House amended the bill to also require the landlord to give 30 days' notice.

HB 1022 (2022)

Authorizes pharmacists to dispense Ivermectin pursuant to a standing order from a physician or APRN. 

The Senate amended the bill to also establish a commission to study the use of Ivermectin to treat Covid-19 and to provide a recommendation regarding whether to make the standing order permanent.

HB 1131 (2022)

Prohibits public schools from adopting, enforcing, or implementing a policy that requires students or members of the public to wear a facial covering.

HB 1178 (2022)

Prohibits any state or local enforcement of any federal laws or actions aimed at limiting firearms.

SB 418 (2022)

Establishes "affidavit balloting" for voters who do not have a valid identification at the polls. Those voters would be given a prepaid envelope to return with documentation proving their eligibility to vote, and their "affidavit ballots" would be numbered and counted separately. Any voter who fails to provide documentation proving their eligibility to vote within ten days of the election would have their ballot pulled and their votes deducted from the official vote totals.

HB 1080 (2022)

Creates a right for health care providers to conscientiously object to participating in providing abortion, sterilization, or artificial contraception services.

HB 1221 (2022)

Reduces the Business Profits Tax rate from 7.6% to 7.5% and the Business Enterprise Tax rate from 0.55% to 0.50% for taxable periods ending on or after December 31, 2023.

The House amended the bill to only cut the Business Profits Tax to 7.5%.

The Senate amended the bill to also provide towns and cities with 7.5% of their retirement contribution costs for teachers, police officers, and firefighters for one year.

HB 1598 (2022)

Allows personal consumption and possession of marijuana over age 21, with some limits (e.g. four ounces of cannabis in plant form). Home-growing would be illegal. The state Liquor Commission would regulate marijuana growing and sales. Revenue from marijuana sales would go to substance misuse-related education, prevention, treatment, and recovery; and offsetting the statewide education property tax.

HB 1210 (2022)

Requires public employers, private employers, and postsecondary education institutions that receive public funds and mandate a vaccination or other inoculation procedure to accept an employee's or student's request for a medical, religious, or right of conscience exemption.

HB 1661 (2022)

Requires sending district schools and career and technical education (CTE) centers to enter into an agreement to include scheduling, access, transportation and credits for CTE students.

The House amended the bill to also set aside $35 million for a new legislative parking garage. The Senate revised the bill to lower this number to $9.35 million.

The Senate also amended this bill to add the substance of SB 430, an omnibus bill about care covered under Medicaid, childcare regulations, and more.

HB 1609 (2022)

Revises the law banning abortions after 24 weeks gestation to include exceptions for rape, incest, and fatal fetal anomalies. This bill also repeals the requirement to conduct an obstetric ultrasound before every abortion. Lastly, this bill requires the Department of Health and Human Services to compile and publish an annual report of statistics relative to abortions after 24 weeks.

HB 1455 (2022)

Prohibits state enforcement of any federal law, order, or rule that requires an individual, as a condition of employment or any other activity, to provide proof of vaccination against COVID-19 or to submit more than once per month to COVID-19 testing.

HB 1495 (2022)

Prohibits employee vaccine requirements for any state or local government employees or government contractors. This bill has an exception for medical providers when there is a direct threat present.

The House amended the bill to prohibit any state or local government from requiring businesses to implement a vaccine mandate, with an exception for medical facilities.

HB 1668 (2022)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks. Also requires private sales or transfers to go through a licensed firearm dealer, if it's not absolutely clear that both the owner and the recipient are allowed to own guns.

HB 1683 (2022)

Repeal the Education Freedom Account program. The program allows the parent of a school age child to receive funds from a scholarship organization to pay for education expenses.

HB 1576 (2022)

Repeals the law aimed at banning critical race theory in public schools and workplaces. That law prohibits the teaching of certain concepts in school and public employee trainings. For example, the law prohibits teaching that people of a certain race or sex are "inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously."

SB 89 (2021)

The House voted to add a new section to the bill that states New Hampshire election laws will not be affected by the passage of the federal "For the People Act."  Supporters argue that this is an important measure to protect the integrity of New Hampshire elections from federal interference.  Opponents argue it is unconstitutional to attempt to nullify federal laws, and this measure could require New Hampshire to run two separate election systems, one for state officials and one for federal officials.

HB 625 (2021)

Prohibits abortion after 24 weeks gestation, unless there is a medical emergency.  There are no exceptions for rape or incest.

The House and Senate added a similar ban to the 2021 state budget bill.

SB 61 (2021)

Right-to-work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union.

HB 1 (2021)

State budget bill.  The governor presented his version of the next state budget February 11.  The House passed a revised version of his budget on April 7.  The Senate passed a different version on June 3.  The House and Senate passed a final version on June 24. Click here to read a summary of the 2021 budget proposals.

HB 2 (2021)

State budget bill (part 2). The governor presented his version of the next state budget February 11.  The House passed a revised version of his budget on April 7.  The Senate passed a different version on June 3. The House and Senate passed a final version on June 24.  Click here to read a summary of the budget proposals.

HB 542 (2021)

Excludes religious gatherings from any prohibition on in-person gatherings during a state of emergency.  The House amended the bill to more broadly protect religious activities. The Senate amended the bill to narrow its scope again; the Senate version requires the state to allow religious services and other activities to proceed to the same or greater extent as other essential business activity during a state of emergency.

HB 177 (2021)

Prohibits the siting of new landfills, excluding expansions of existing landfills, within 2 miles of state parks. "State parks" do not include state historic sites and recreational rail trails.

The House voted to add this bill to SB 103, but the Senate rejected that change.

HB 121 (2021)

Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by House and Senate party leaders after an application process.

HB 458 (2021)

Repeals the the law that requires public middle schools and high schools to provide menstrual hygiene products at no cost. This bill then permits school health departments "to make reasonable efforts to secure, through grants and donations, and distribute menstrual hygiene products to students in need."

SB 141 (2021)

Authorizes the FBI to conduct all National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) searches concerning the purchase, sale, and transfer of firearms through Federal Firearm Licensees operating in New Hampshire. This bill then abolishes the "gun line" in the State Police and repeals the state’s partial point of contact system for handguns, allowing the authority to remain exclusively with the FBI.

HB 481 (2019)

Legalizes and taxes marijuana for adults over age twenty-one. A Cannabis Control Commission, similar to the Liquor Commission, would be responsible for licensing and enforcement. The bill also allows limited home-growing of marijuana for personal use.

HB 1247 (2020)

Requires landlords to provide at least 90 days notice before a rent increase over 5%. The House amended the bill to require 60 days notice for an increase over 5% and 90 days notice for an increase over 8%. The Senate amended the bill to instead remove the requirement of an eviction notice before public welfare departments provide rental assistance. The amended bill also "creates a duty of good faith and fair dealing for mortgage lenders." Lastly, the amended bill requires landlords to offer tenants a 6-month repayment plan for rent missed during the coronavirus emergency.

HB 1672 (2020)

Allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, whether or not he or she will actually be absent on election day. The Senate amended the bill to become the "Coronavirus Election Protection Act of 2020." The amended bill allows any voter to vote by absentee ballot, allows town officials to start processing ballots before Election Day, and authorizes online voter registration.

HB 687 (2019)

Establishes "extreme risk protection orders," based on evidence that there is "a significant risk of causing bodily injury to himself or herself or others," which would require the subject of the order to surrender any firearms to law enforcement.

HB 1577 (2020)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. Parental permission is required if a minor seeks a birth certificate change. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate.

HB 1280 (2020)

Caps how much health insurers can charge consumers for insulin at $100 for a 30-day supply. The Senate amended the bill to instead cap the payment at $30 for a 30-day supply.

HB 1166 (2020)

Establishes a committee to study the demographics of the uninsured population in New Hampshire, the barriers to obtaining healthcare coverage, and possible solutions to extend health insurance coverage. The Senate completely amended the bill to add various requirements and protections for employers and employees related to the coronavirus. For example, the amended bill allows employees to collect unemployment if they cannot go to work because they or a family member is sick with COVID-19 - even if Gov. Sununu ends the state of emergency.

HB 1664 (2020)

Requires the Department of Environmental Services to establish a climate action plan, an office of the environmental advocate, and an oversight commission on environmental services. The House amended the bill to instead establish greenhouse gas emission reduction goals for the state. Those goals are a 20% reduction in statewide emissions by 2025, 50% by 2035, and 80% by 2050 (all compared to 1990 emissions). The amended bill also gives the Department of Environmental Services the authority to develop and update regularly a climate action plan.

HB 1645 (2020)

Extends the waiting period to annul a misdemeanor domestic violence offense, from 3 to 10 years. The Senate amended the bill to incorporate several other pieces of legislation.

HB 1454 (2020)

Gives local school boards the power to determine whether to grant academic credit for alternative extended learning and work-based programs. At the time of this bill's submission, that power lies with the state board of education. The Senate amended the bill to still require the state board of education to vet and approve alternative extended learning and work-based programs, which local school boards "may" accept for credit (similar to a different bill, SB 514).

HB 1264 (2020)

Extends the Commission on the Seacoast Cancer Investigation from 2020 to 2022. The Senate amended the legislation to incorporate several bills related to PFAS. In particular, the amended bill establishes maximum contaminant levels for perflourinated compounds (PFCs), as originally written in SB 287.

HB 712 (2019)

Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. As introduced, this bill does not include an opt-out option.

HB 1648 (2020)

Permits adults to possess up to 3/4 of an ounce of cannabis, 5 grams of hashish, and other cannabis-infused products, and permits adults to grow up to 6 cannabis plants at home in a secure location that is not visible from other properties. This bill also allows adults to give marijuana products away and sell marijuana accessories.

HB 731 (2019)

Gradually raises the state minimum wage, starting at $12 per hour in 2020 and ending at $15 per hour in 2024. The bill also raises the tipped minimum wage, although in 2024 it would still be 45% of the regular minimum wage. The bill requires cost of living adjustments every year. This bill also allows cities and towns to set a higher minimum wage. Lastly, this bill establishes a "training wage," no lower than $8.50, for employees under age eighteen for the first three months of employment.

HB 685 (2019)

Prohibits balance billing for ambulance services. The bill also limits reimbursement for ambulance services to a "commercially reasonable value." The Senate amended the bill to instead require insurance plans which cover maternity benefits to provide coverage for emergency or elective abortion services (similar to SB 486).

HB 514 (2019)

Establishes a seven day waiting period for the delivery of a firearm. There are some exceptions for rifle or shotgun purchases by hunters, law enforcement officers, and members of the armed forces. The Senate amended the bill, shortening the waiting period to three days.

HB 706 (2019)

Establishes a fifteen member independent redistricting commission, appointed by the secretary of state after a public application process that includes input from legislative leaders. The Senate amended the bill, generally giving the Secretary of State less say in the process.

SB 1 (2019)

Establishes a paid family and medical leave insurance program, which would be run by the state department of employment security. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. Employees could take up to twelve weeks of leave and receive 60% of their pay after paying into the program for at least six months. The bill does not allow anyone to opt-out of the program.

HB 2 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill (part 2).

HB 1 (2019)

2020-2021 state budget bill.

HB 564 (2019)

Makes it a misdemeanor to carry a firearm in a safe school zone. ˙There are some exceptions, for example if a person gets permission from the school board. The House amended the bill so that parents do not need to remove or unload firearms in their cars when picking up students. The amendment also specifically bans firearms on "school property" rather than in "school zones." School property includes buildings, grounds, school buses, and vans.

SB 290 (2019)

Modifies the work and community engagement requirements for the Granite Advantage Health Care Program, commonly known as expanded Medicaid. For example, this bill extends the work requirement exemption for parents so that parents of children under age 13 are eligible for the exemption. This bill also gives the Department of Health and Human Services the authority to waive the work requirement until July 2021 if there is an inability to communicate with program participants.

HB 109 (2019)

Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers. Those dealers are required to perform background checks. Also requires private sales or transfers to go through a licensed firearm dealer, if it’s not absolutely clear that both the owner and the recipient are allowed to own guns.

HB 365 (2019)

Increases the electric generating capacity of customer generators who may participate in net energy metering, generally from 1 megawatt to 5 megawatts.

HB 446 (2019)

Allows an individual to obtain a new birth certificate based on a change of gender identity, as certified by a licensed health care provider. At the time of this bill's submission, a court order is required to change a birth certificate. This bill also allows a gender identity of nonbinary on a birth certificate. The Senate amended the bill, for example to require the permission of a parent or guardian if a minor seeks a birth certificate change.

SB 10 (2019)

Increases the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020, then to $11 in 2022, except starting that year, employers would have to pay at least $12 per hour if they do not offer at least 10 paid sick days to employees.  The House and Senate amended the bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour in 2020 and $12 per hour in 2022, regardless of sick time.

HB 455 (2019)

Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole.

HB 105 (2019)

Generally repeals the voter registration changes passed in SB 3. For example, this bill removes the stricter requirements for voters who register within 30 days of an election. This bill also removes much of the new language on voter registration forms about domicile. This bill also removes the authority of the secretary of state to conduct post-election voter registration investigations, leaving that to the attorney general.

HB 558 (2019)

Prohibits food service businesses from providing a single-use plastic straw to a customer unless specifically requested.

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